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CFH Fall Conference Proposal Ideasinclude, butare certainly not

limited to, sessions and/or panels that . . .

*Are devoted to thinking abouthow professors might use Christian

perspectives to shape history curricula and/or guide the teaching of history

*Discuss influentialhistorical monographs by any author, on any

subject, written from any perspective

*Are organizedaccording to one or multiple distinct confessional

frameworks or traditions of Christianbelief (Lutheran, Reformed, Baptist,

Anabaptist, Anglican, Pentecostal, etc.) that hope to explorethe unique

contributions thateach makes to the enterprise of studying and interpreting

the past.

Such sessions may consider the possibility of making discussions

more concrete by organizing papers around a common historical problem

(i.e. revolution, war, gender,popular culture, market capitalism, reform,

ethnicity, liberty, poverty, etc.)

*Generate discussionof particular non-historiographic "classic" texts

that may/have provide(d) insights into helping Christiansthink more

carefully about history (i.e. Niebuhr,CHRIST AND CULTURE; Yoder, THE

POLITICS OF JESUS;Volf, EXCLUSION AND EMBRACE; Ruether, SEXISM

AND GOD-TALK; Tinder, THE POLITICAL MEANINGOF CHRISTIANITY;

Gutierrez, A THEOLOGY OF LIBERATION; Kuyper, LECTURESON

CALVINISM; Neuhaus, THE NAKED PUBLICSQUARE; or many, many

others!)

*Question the value and even validity of providing a Christianaccount

of the past

*Invite non-historian theoreticians tooffer insights that may prove

valuable for Christian historical thinking

*Honor particularly notable Christian scholars by discussing their

work from various perspectives and seeking to determine their unique

contributions to the enterprise of Christian historiography

*Explore what some view as thejarring disjuncture between graduate

school training in history and the quest to develop a Christianframework for

understanding the past. (Although Christians asChristians are widely

accepted and embraced in most graduate programsin history, they receive

little by way of encouragement toward developinga Christian conceptual

framework for doing their work while they are in graduate school)

*Invite historians from non-Christiantraditions to grapple with issues

[CONVERTED BY MYRMIDON]