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Department of Agricultural Studies

The Department of Agricultural Studies, associated with the Haupert Institute for Agricultural Studies, promotes a Christian perspective of agriculture. The majors in the department strives to prepare students to permeate the agricultural business, education, and research and development sectors, with a Christ-centered, faith-integrated, stewardship-oriented education. Many agricultural producers and professionals resonate with the “Faith Family Farming” values of HU’s ag program. Farms, agribusinesses, agricultural research universities, and non-governmental organizations that serve in agricultural endeavors will benefit from the perspectives of graduates of this department, as they live out their faith by contributing to the work of feeding the world. Hallmarks of the department and the institute include outreach to the agribusiness, ag education, ag missions, and ag research communities, as well as internships, connections with organizations that promote agriculture to young people such as 4-H and FFA and opportunities for students in agricultural missions. The department offers majors in animal sciencecrop science and agronomyagricultural education, and agribusiness, and a minor in agribusiness. The agribusiness major offers eight different tracks for students to choose from, including animal production, crop production, communications and public policy, economics and finance, entrepreneurial small business management, management, marketing, and ministry and missions.

Students who complete a bachelor of science degree in animal science will be prepared for graduate programs in various animal science fields as well as entry-level research and technical positions in animal science. To earn this degree, students complete the foundational agricultural courses of AG 111, 221/L, 231/L, 241, and 495 (two hours); 17 hours from AG 321/L, 323, 325, 351/L, 365/L, and 373; basic science courses BI 161/L, 321/L, CH161/L, 162/L, 263/L, 264/L, and 411; in addition to four hours from BI 222/L, 371/L, 432/L, and 462/L. The core curriculum course, MA 151, is necessary and will fulfill the mathematical science requirement. It is suggested that students take EB 211 to fulfill one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum, as well as other business courses for elective credit.

Students who complete a bachelor of science degree in crop science and agronomy will be prepared for graduate programs in crop science, agronomy, or soil science as well as entry-level agricultural research or technical jobs. To earn this degree, students complete the foundational agriculture courses of AG 111, 221/L, 231/L, 241, and 495 (two hours); additional agriculture courses AG 311, 331/L, 335, 341/L, and 361/L; basic science courses BI 161/L, 321/L, CH 161/L, 162/L, 263/L, 264/L, and 411; and four hours from BI 261/L, 432/L, 462/L, MA 171, and PH 211/L (more of these last five courses are recommended for students who want to pursue graduate studies in plant genetics or biotechnology). The core curriculum course, MA 151, is necessary and will fulfill the mathematical science requirement. It is suggested that students take EB 211 to fulfill one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum. Majors in crop science and agronomy who intend to pursue careers in precision agriculture are also encouraged to take DM 120 (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Training) as an elective.

Students who complete a bachelor of science degree in agricultural education can be licensed in Indiana to teach agriculture in middle school and high school settings. To earn this degree, students complete AG 111, 121, 131, 141, 221/L, 231/L, 241, 251, 331/L, 335, 495; four hour elective in Animal or Crop production; BA 232, 252, 343; EB 211; BI 161/L, 321/L; and CH 141/L. The core curriculum course, MA 151, is necessary and will fulfill the mathematical science requirement. Students must also complete the professional education courses required of those wishing to teach at the middle school and high school level, including PY 111 to be taken in the freshman year; AE 212, ED 236, AE 296, and SE 232 to be taken in the sophomore year; AE 311, AE 320, ED 364 and ED 395 to be taken in the junior year; ED 410AE, ED 440 and ED 460 during the senior year.

Students may earn the bachelor of science degree in agribusiness by completing AG 111, 221/L, 231/L, 241, 311, 495 (2 hours); BA 232, 252, 343, 421; EB 211, 212; BI 161/L, 321/L; and CH 141/L.  The core curriculum course, MA 151, is necessary and will fulfill the mathematical science requirement. Agribusiness majors are encouraged to consider taking DM 120 (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Training) as an elective. It is suggested that students take PS 111 to fulfill one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum. Students must also complete at least one of the following eight tracks.

The animal production track requires at least 15 hours from the following: AG 251, 321/L, 323, 325/L (or BA 331), 351/L, 365/L, and 373. AG 373 is recommended for those pursuing graduate education in a field related to animal science.

The communications and public policy track requires at least 15 hours from the following: AR 107, CO 213, 241, 331, 381, DM 155, 281 (or 231), 395, OA 371, PS 111, 321.

The crop production track requires at least 15 hours from the following: AG 251, 331/L, 335, 341/L, 361/L, BA 331.

The economics and finance track requires EB 325, 376, 381, 421 and 461.

The entrepreneurial small business management track requires BA 211, 281, 301, 331, 384 and at least four hours from other AG, BA or OA courses.

The management track requires BA 281, 331, 431, 461 and OA 371.

The marketing track requires BA 281, 311, 326, 461 and 473.

The ministry and missions track requires MI 211, 242, 321 and six hours from EB 421, MI 233CO, 233CP, 233LA, 233RS, 233ST, 233UM, 365, 373, 395, 421, or 495.

Students may earn a minor in agribusiness by completing AG 111, 221/L (or 231/L); BA 232, 252, 343; BI 161/L; and CH 141/L. Students are recommended to take EB 211 to fulfill one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum.

Courses in Agricultural Studies

AE 212 Introduction to Agricultural Education
(2 credits - Fall)

The foundations of agricultural education are explored in this course. The effects that developments and research in teaching and agriculture have on curriculum and the role of the teacher are studied. Students are introduced to the "Teacher as Effective Steward" model and encouraged to develop their own philosophy of agricultural education in response to that model.
This course must be taken before the junior year.

AE 296 Sophomore Practicum for Agricultural Education
(1 credit - Fall, Spring)

Students will do at least 30 hours of observation and participation with a middle school or high school agricultural education program. Reflections related to these classroom experiences will be required.
Prerequisites: AE 212 or ED 236 or SE 232 or concurrent

AE 311 Early Adolescent Curriculum and Methodology for Agricultural Education
(3 credits - Fall)

This course, first in a sequence of secondary methods courses, addresses adolescent development along with an introduction to middle school philosophy and curriculum. The course provides the context for developing instructional strategy, assessment forms and techniques for enhancing middles school agricultural education programs. A 30-hour field experience is required.
Prerequisites: ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

AE 320 Adolescent Curriculum and Methodology for Agricultural Education
(3 credits - Spring)

This course gives the secondary education candidate experience developing instructional strategies appropriate for high school agricultural education curriculum with an emphasis on performance based learning and assessment. In addition, classroom management, student learning style, writing across the curriculum, along with further exploration of cultural proficiency will be addressed.
Prerequisites: AE 311 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

AG 111 Introduction to Agriculture
(3 credits - Fall)

The course serves as an introduction to the agriculture business major. Topics discussed include the general scope of agriculture, including farm safety, an overview of the kinds of employment opportunities that exist within the field of agriculture business, and the basics of farm equipment.

AG 117 Introduction to Horticulture
(3 credits - Spring)

This course presents an overview of horticulture emphasizing the basic concepts of plant identification, production, and uses.
This is a concurrent course offered at Huntington North High School.

AG 121 Welding
(3 credits - Spring)

Emphasizes gaining a basic level of proficiency in a variety of common welding processes. Blueprint reading, welding safety, terminology and quality control.

AG 131 Construction and Maintenance
(3 credits - Fall)

Experiential learning of basic construction and maintenance skills and practical knowledge. Safety, careers, mechanical power system (engines and hydraulics), construction materials and structures, electrical and plumbing for typical home and agricultural structures.

AG 141 Agricultural Machinery Operation and Safety
(2 credits - Spring)

Principles and practical knowledge required for the operation of farm equipment typically used in modern agriculture. Procedures for safe operation of farm equipment. Principles and operational knowledge of precision agricultural equipment. Technological advances in agricultural production.

AG 221 Crop Science
(3 credits - Spring)

Crop science is the discipline of producing food, feed, fiber and fuel crops. Students will study basic plant science, including plant structure, function, growth, development and reproduction. Additional topics include the role of plants and agriculture in God's Word, the influence of crop production on society and the economy and the major crop plants of Indiana and the world. The course introduces the role of biotechnology, crop breeding and cropping systems in modern crop production. This course includes a lab component.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 221L.
Prerequisite: AG 111

AG 221L Laboratory for Crop Science
(1 credit - Spring)

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which support, extend, or complement the concepts presented in the lecture course.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 221.

AG 231 Animal Science
(3 credits - Spring)

The history, physiology, anatomy, breeding, nutritional needs and products of farm animals will be discussed. The primary focus is on cattle, sheep, poultry and swine. This course will have a lab component.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 231L.
Prerequisite: AG 111

AG 231L Laboratory for Animal Science
(1 credit - Spring)

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which support, extend, or complement the concepts presented in the lecture course.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 231.

AG 241 Agroecology
(3 credits - Fall Even Years)

This course introduces students to the principles of agricultural ecology, emphasizing the role of Christian stewardship of natural resources in farming in agribusiness. Topics covered include the development of agroecology systems, soil conservation, ecological disturbance, biodiversity, nutrient cycling, energy-efficient techniques, integration of technology and challenges to sustainable agricultural practices in developed and developing countries.
Prerequisite: AG 111

AG 251 Food Science
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

Chemistry, microbiology and processing of foods. Food additives, food safety and biotechnology of foods. Regulatory aspects of food processing, quality, safety and labeling. Manufacturing practices to ensure food quality and safety.
Identical with BI 251.
Prerequisite: CH 141/L or 161/L

AG 311 Data Management GIS
(3 credits - Fall Even Years)

This course introduces the concepts and principles of GIS database planning, design, implementation and administration for agricultural enterprises. Topics included are data collection, data storage and processing, extraction of data, data analytics and visualization to improve profitability, productivity and sustainability.
Prerequisite: MA 151

AG 321 Animal Anatomy and Physiology
(3 credits - Fall Odd Years)

Structure and function of animal body systems, with reference to farm animals. Includes tissues, organs and systems and their physiological functions. Tissue and organ systems covered include blood, nervous, sensory, endocrine, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, digestive, reproductive and lactation.
Identical with BI 322. Must be taken concurrently with AG 321L.
Prerequisite: AG 231/L

AG 321L Laboratory for Animal Anatomy and Physiology
(1 credit - Fall Odd Years)

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which support, extend, or complement the concepts presented in the lecture course.
Identical with BI 322L. Must be taken concurrently with AG 321.

AG 323 Animal Health and Disease
(3 credits - Fall Odd Years)

Maintaining the health of farm animals through an understanding of diseases caused or influenced by pathogens, inadequate nutrition or environmental hazards. Management of animal diseases that affect humans. Animal welfare and ethical issues in managing animals.
Identical with BI 323.
Prerequisite: AG 231/L

AG 325 Livestock Management and Production
(3 credits - Fall Even Years)

Management practices essential for the production of various farm animal species. Topics will include general health, nutrition, handling, and husbandry. This course includes a lab component.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 325L.
Prerequisite: AG 231/L

AG 325L Laboratory for Livestock Management and Production
(1 credit - Fall Even Years)

This laboratory component will provide hands-on animal production experience. Various animal production operations will be visited as part of the course.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 325.

AG 331 Soil and Weather Science
(3 credits - Fall Even Years)

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the field of soil science with an emphasis on scientific principles and their application in solutions to practical soil management problems. An overview of weather and climate will also be a part of this class. This course includes a lab component.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 331L.
Prerequisite: AG 221/L

AG 331L Laboratory for Soil and Weather Science
(1 credit - Fall Even Years)

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which support, extend, or complement the concepts presented in the lecture course.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 331.

AG 335 Crop Health and Pest Management
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

Diseases, insects and weeds that affect crop plants. Emphasis on integrated pest management strategies to maintain crop health, including chemical, biological, cultural and biotechnological control methods.
Prerequisite: AG 221/L

AG 341 Crop Production
(3 credits - Fall Odd Years)

This course focuses on the production of grain, forage and biofuel crops in the Midwest. Students examine new and innovative crop production strategies that promote sustainable agricultural practices. Challenges to crop production in the Midwest are examined in detail, including planting strategies, pest control, plant nutrition, harvesting techniques and the influence of markets and government policies. This course includes a lab component.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 341L.
Prerequisite: AG 221/L

AG 341L Laboratory for Crop Production
(1 credit - Fall Odd Years)

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which support, extend, or complement the concepts presented in the lecture course.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 341.

AG 351 Nutrition of Farm Animals
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

The composition, nutritional value, relative quality and cost of food for animals will be discussed. This course includes a lab component.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 351L.
Prerequisite: AG 231/L

AG 351L Laboratory for Nutrition of Farm Animals
(1 credit - Spring Even Years)

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which support, extend, or complement the concepts presented in the lecture course.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 351.

AG 361 Plant Breeding
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

This course focuses on traditional breeding and modern molecular techniques used to improve the productivity, disease resistance and stress tolerance of crop plants. Central topics include the genetic and phenotypic variation in crop plants, how such variation is produced and controlled in developing new varieties and hybrids, and the maintenance of high quality plant stocks. This course includes a lab component.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 361L.
Prerequisites: AG 221/L and BI 321/L

AG 361L Laboratory for Plant Breeding
(1 credit - Spring Odd Years)

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which support, extend, or complement the concepts presented in the lecture course.
Must be taken concurrently with AG 361.

AG 365 Reproduction and Breeding of Farm Animals
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

Fundamental physiological processes of reproduction in farm animals. Male and female reproductive systems and function, endocrine relationships, fertility and factors affecting reproductive efficiency. Current methods used in managing farm animal reproduction, including artificial insemination and embryo transfer. Population and quantitative genetics as they relate to animal breeding and mating systems used for the improvement of various livestock/farm animal species and breeds.
Identical with BI 365. Must be taken concurrently with AG 365L.
Prerequisites: AG 231/L, 321/L and BI 321/L

AG 365L Laboratory for Reproduction and Breeding of Farm Animals
(1 credit - Spring Odd Years)

Laboratory experiments and demonstrations which support, extend, or complement the concepts presented in the lecture course.
Identical with BI 365L. Must be taken concurrently with AG 365.

AG 373 Animal Growth and Development
(3 credits - Fall Even Years)

Overview of how cell types differentiate, how tissues develop, and how bodies grow throughout the lifespan of mammals, bird, etc. Changes during prenatal and postnatal growth and development will be discussed. This course does not include a lab component.
Identical with BI 373.
Prerequisite: BI 161/L

AG 395 Practicum in Agribusiness
(1 to 3 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

Practicum in some aspect of agribusiness designed to give student practical, directed experience.
Prerequisite: Consent

AG 490 Independent Study
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

A study or a research project related to agriculture, the subject of which will be determined by the instructor according to student interest.
Prerequisite: Consent

AG 495 Internship in Agriculture
(2 to 4 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

Students will work with an organization in the community to obtain experience in the field of agriculture. The internship should be in the area of the student's chosen major.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and agricultural studies major