Christ.  Scholarship.  Service.

Department of Occupational Therapy Assistant

For detailed information regarding the Occupational Therapy Assistant program, please download a PDF of the OTA Academic Catalog.

Program Description

The bachelor of science degree in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA), offered at Huntington University’s main campus in Huntington, Indiana, provides students with entry-level preparation for the field of occupational therapy as an assistant who works under the supervision of an occupational therapist. The OTA graduate may enter the workforce following successful passing of the national exam or apply to a masters or doctoral program to become an occupational therapist or use their bachelor’s degree to apply to other graduate programs such as physical therapy and speech language pathology. Our program was granted accreditation on April 9, 2020 and is the first program to be granted accreditation for a bachelors level program in occupational therapy assistant.  Accreditation qualifies students to sit for the national certification examination in occupational therapy assistant (NBCOT). Program candidates may apply for admission in their sophomore year or earlier if they have approved transfer credit. Our goal is to provide a Christian learning environment where compassionate care is a part of serving the health and wellness needs of others.

Coursework is completed with in-depth learning in designated classrooms and laboratory space. The OTA Program is located in the Dowden Science Hall on the first floor with two labs located on the lower level of the Science Hall. Students gain mastery skills in professional writing, assessment and intervention strategies, professional behaviors, commitment to life-long learning, scholarship, leadership, and technology through guided learning experiences.

The central themes of Huntington University’s Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant Program are the following:

Christ, Scholarship, and Service

  • Personal and Professional Life Journey (modeling faith, health, leadership, scholarship and professional service)
  • Excellence in Innovation

The mission of the occupational therapy assistant program at Huntington University focuses on the personal and professional journey of students through providing Christ-centered education that focuses on developing occupational practitioners who are highly skilled to provide compassionate, competent, occupation-based interventions, while demonstrating leadership and advocacy skills and a commitment to life-long learning.

Program Distinctives

  • Huntington University is an innovator in the field of occupational therapy as it has the first program to receive accreditation to provide the OTA degree at the bachelor level.
  • Our OTA program has ties to a doctoral degree pathway option at Huntington University.
  • Rigorous coursework provides students with a comprehensive preparation.
  • The program meets or exceeds requirements for ACOTE accreditation.
  • Integration of faith and practice is embedded in coursework.
  • Professors are licensed and experienced occupational therapy practitioners.
  • Fieldwork provides students with multiple real-world clinical experiences.

Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE)

Huntington University’s baccalaureate-degree-level Occupational Therapy Assistant Program is accredited (as of April 9, 2020) by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA).

Additional information related to current accreditation status can be obtained from:

Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy (ACOTE)
of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA)
6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 200 
North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929
Phone: 301-652-6611 Department extensions Accreditation - x2042
TDD: 1-800-377-8555
Fax: 301-652-7711
Website:  www.acoteonline.org

Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition, all states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT Certification Examination or attain state licensure.

Admission Requirements for the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program

Students will apply to the OTA program during a fall semester. To be considered for admission to the OTA Program, students must supply the following information. When this information is received, the OTA Admissions Committee will act on the application.

  • OTA Candidates must be currently enrolled at Huntington University or meet the transfer requirements. OTA Candidates must achieve a grade of B- (2.67 out of 4) or better in all prerequisite courses, which must have been completed within ten years prior to application. Courses in progress need to be outlined in writing for plan of completion. Official transcripts showing completion of prerequisites with a grade of B- or better will be required prior to program matriculation.
  • OTA Candidates must complete a writing sample. This sample can be completed on site or through an approved testing site.
  • OTA Candidates must have successfully completed OT 100 Introduction to Occupational Therapy at Huntington University.
  • OTA Candidates need to submit three letters of recommendation. At least one of the three recommendations required for application must be from a healthcare provider, preferably a licensed occupational therapy practitioner.
  • OTA Candidates will also complete an interview upon request from the OTA Department.
  • Students will be required to pass background and substance abuse checks in order to be eligible for fieldwork. Eligibility requirements for the national exam for becoming an occupational therapy assistant can be retrieved at www.nbcot.org. NBCOT, One Bank Street, Suite 300, Gaithersburg, MD 20878; Phone: (301) 990-7979; E-mail: info@nbcot.org

Students will be notified of their acceptance in the OTA program during the same fall term they applied.

Prerequisites:
Overall GPA 3.0 or higher and prerequisite courses at B- or 2.67 or higher

 Biology with lab     3-4 semester credits
 Introduction to Psychology    3 semester credits
 Academic Writing and Research   3 semester credits
 Anatomy and Physiology I with lab   3-4 semester credits
 Anatomy and Physiology II with lab (enrolled or completed)   3-4 semester credits
 Medical Terminology   2-3 semester credits
 OT 100 Introduction to OT (enrolled or completed) 2 semester credits

 

 

 

 

 

Transfer Students

Students in the Occupational Therapy Assistant program may only transfer in courses that meet core curriculum requirements and may not transfer courses in the major.

Progression in the OTA Program

Coursework is developmental in nature and requires coursework to be sequential as listed in the OTA Completion Plan. Completion of fieldwork must be completed within 24 months or two years from didactic coursework. Timeline from matriculation to graduation should not exceed six years.

Eligibility for Progression

  • Students must earn a grade of at least B- or better in each OTA course.
  • All OTA courses must be completed with a B- or better before progression into the next semester in the OTA curriculum. Individual course syllabi define evaluative components for each OTA course. If students receive a grade below a B- for an OTA course, students must step out of the program until the course is offered again. If students are unsuccessful in two OTA courses, they will be dismissed from the OTA program. This includes fieldwork courses.
  • In order to graduate from the OTA program with a bachelor’s degree in OTA, students must achieve an overall GPA of 3.0.
  • Students must provide updated documentation of current CPR certification, health insurance, immunization/screening, etc., as required by the fieldwork site.

Incompletes

Students must petition the vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty for an incomplete by submitting an incomplete grade request form. When students are granted a grade of Incomplete (I) in an OTA course, a grade of B- or better must be earned prior to the first day of the next semester’s OTA courses. If students do not satisfactorily complete the required work for the course, students will not be allowed to continue in the OTA program.

Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant Completion Plan

The four-year program completion plan is as follows: 

Fall Year 117 s.h. 
SO 1113Principles of Sociology
EX 2872Medical Terminology
EN 1213Academic Writing and Research
OT 1002Introduction to Occupational Therapy
BI 1114Biology in the Modern World with Lab
HS 1153Historical Perspectives on Culture and Civilization I
January Term Year 12 s.h. 
Elective2January Term Elective
Spring Year 115 s.h. 
PY 1113Introduction to Psychology
MA 1514Introduction to Probability and Statistics
EX 1012Wellness for Life
HS 1163Historical Perspective on Culture and Civilization II
EN 1513Perspectives on Literature
Fall Year 217 s.h. 
BI 2414Human Anatomy and Physiology I with Lab
PY 2303Human Development
BT ___3Introductory Bible
CO 2153Public Speaking
PY 4613Abnormal Psychology
 1Creative Studio Arts
January Term Year 22 s.h. 
Elective2January Term Elective
Spring Year 217 s.h. 
BI 2424Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab
PL 2203Introduction to Philosophy
BT 333TB3Theological Bioethics
OT 2002Human Occupations
MI 2853Understanding the Christian Faith
__ 1152Artistic Appreciation
Fall Year 315 s.h. 
OT 3004Foundation and Framework of Occupational Therapy Practice
NU 3502Interprofessional Research
OT 3023Psychosocial Factors in Occupational Therapy
NU 3053Pathophysiology
Elective3Elective
January Term Year 32 s.h. 
OT 3062Service Learning in Occupational Therapy
Spring Year 312 s.h. 
OT 3113Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology for Occupational Therapy
OT 311L1Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab for Occupational Therapy
OT 3123Pediatrics Interventions in Occupational Therapy
OT 312L1Pediatrics Interventions in Occupational Therapy Lab
OT 3133Medical Documentation for Occupational Therapy
OT 3141Fieldwork Ia: Clinical Immersion and Competency
Fall Year 414 s.h. 
OT 4003Adult and Older Adult Interventions in Occupational Therapy
OT 400L1Adult and Older Adult Interventions in Occupational Therapy Lab
OT 4013Management and Leadership in Occupational Therapy
OT 4023Technology in Occupational Therapy
OT 4141Fieldwork Ib: Clinical Immersion and Competency
OT 4153Baccalaureate Project I
Spring Year 415 s.h. 
OT 4206Fieldwork IIa: Clinical Immersion and Competency
OT 4306Fieldwork IIb: Clinical Immersion and Competency
OT 4403Baccalaureate Project II

Courses in Occupational Therapy Assistant

OT 100 Introduction to Occupational Therapy
(2 credits - Fall)

This course introduces the students to OT, OT history, philosophical principles, current issues, and emerging practice areas, along with global perspectives. Students will understand the transition from student to practitioner, OT roles and responsibilities, relationships, practicing legally and ethically, and about OT professional organizations. Introduction to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework (OTPF), OT across the lifespan, treatment settings, and models of care will be explored. Additionally, service management functions, OT process, theories of practice and frames of reference, intervention modalities, therapeutic relationships, and therapeutic reasoning will be covered.

OT 200 Human Occupations
(2 credits - Spring)

Students begin to define the components and unique nature of occupation. Topics covered include health and wellness, sleep, life transitions and their effects on occupation and occupational balance for health promotion, wellness, prevention, and quality of life. Students begin to understand globalization, population health, chronic disease management, and at-risk populations. Spirituality, diversity, and cultural perspectives are included throughout the course. Students learn how policy effects occupation and the importance of teaching and learning. Other areas taught are interprofessional competency, health literacy, deprivation, justice, disparity, and social injustice. Students start to incorporate the OTPF, client-centered and evidenced-based practice, progressing to task and activity analysis. Adaptation and grading of occupations are also explored as well as safe performance of tasks within various contexts.
Prerequisites: EX 287, OT 100, and PY 230

OT 300 Foundation and Framework of Occupational Therapy Practice
(4 credits - Fall)

Students will begin to interpret and demonstrate an understanding of the OT Practice Framework as it applies to OT practice. Students will be introduced to occupational therapy terminology and the interactions between the areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, context and environment and client factors all within different frames of reference, models of practice, and theoretical frameworks. Focus will be given to the therapeutic alliance, special environments of care, patient/client safety and dignity, mobility, and ensuring the use of purposeful and meaningful interventions. This course provides examination of the OTA/OTD collaborative relationship, including roles and relationships, shared decision-making, using evidence-based practice, scope of practice, ethics (AOTA Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice), liability, communication, and ethical conflict resolution. Students will learn to assess physiological status, safe patient positioning, physical transfers, wheelchair management, mobility devices, bed mobility, use of adaptive equipment for compensatory strategies, safe seated mobility, and safety in the workplace.
Prerequisite: OT 200

OT 302 Psychosocial Factors in Occupational Therapy
(3 credits - Fall)

This course explores the role and skills of the OTA when working with specific symptoms and pathologies of psychiatric diagnoses and behavior disorders. Evaluation tools, frames of reference, treatment interventions and approaches, communication and interactions skills and documentation methods are practiced and learned. Therapeutic use of self and group dynamics are developed as part of the intervention process.
Prerequisite: OT 200

OT 306 Service Learning in Occupational Therapy
(2 credits - January)

Students will demonstrate knowledge of the social determinants of health for persons, groups, and populations with or at risk for disabilities and chronic health conditions. Sociocultural, socioeconomic, and diversity factors, along with advocacy skills are experienced through participating and engagement in service-learning activities in our local communities.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of OT 300

OT 311 Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology for Occupational Therapy
(3 credits - Spring)

This course emphasizes the application of concepts of human anatomy (particularly the musculoskeletal system) and physical law to the study of human movement and skill analysis.
Must be taken concurrently with OT 311L.
Prerequisite: OT 306

OT 311L Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab for Occupational Therapy
(1 credit - Spring)

Concepts of physics and kinesiology are applied through practical therapeutic analysis and assessment from a predominantly biomechanical frame of reference.
Must be taken concurrently with OT 311.
Prerequisite: OT 306

OT 312 Pediatric Interventions in Occupational Therapy
(3 credits - Spring)

Pediatric assessment and intervention strategies incorporating theoretical strategies and evidence-based practice are applied to youth and children. These concepts are examined across the span of developmental stages of children and youth in relation to their occupational performance.
Must be taken concurrently with OT 312L.
Prerequisite: OT 306

OT 312L Pediatric Interventions in Occupational Therapy Lab
(1 credit - Spring)

Strategies for screening, assessment, and interventions are applied to youth and children through various play and evidence-based interventions.
Must be taken concurrently with OT 312.

OT 313 Medical Documentation for Occupational Therapy
(3 credits - Spring)

Professional documentation skills are developed and critiqued to meet regulatory and reimbursement requirements. Emphasis is on effective communication in oral, nonverbal, written, and electronic methods. Students learn and apply the principles of OSHA, HIPPA, and telehealth/medicine.
Prerequisite: OT 306

OT 314 Fieldwork Ia: Clinical Immersion and Competency (Pediatrics or Psychosocial)
(1 credit - Spring)

The pediatric or psychosocial fieldwork I is directed observation and participation through clinical immersion. Students apply classroom learning pertaining to pediatric or psychosocial issues that limit engagement in occupation. Students participate in client-centered practice with a health care or wellness practitioner to develop professional behaviors and communication skills. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate appropriate competencies for the population.
Prerequisites: NU 305, NU350, OT 300, and OT 302

OT 400 Adult and Older Adult Interventions in Occupational Therapy
(3 credits - Fall)

Adult and older adult assessment and intervention strategies incorporating theoretical strategies and evidence-based practice are applied for individuals, groups, and populations. These concepts are examined across the lifespan of the adult and progressing to end-of-life. Concepts related to these populations are explored such as productive aging, health and wellness, aging in place, and end-of-life care.
Must be taken concurrently with OT 400L.
Prerequisites: OT 311/L, 312/L, 313, and 314

OT 400L Adult and Older Adult Interventions in Occupational Therapy Lab
(1 credit - Fall)

Strategies for screening, assessment, and interventions are applied to adults and older adults addressing various roles and evidence-based practice.
Must be taken concurrently with OT 400.

OT 401 Management and Leadership in Occupational Therapy
(3 credits - Fall)

The role of the OTA is defined regarding principles of leadership and management, agency/state/federal regulations, legislation, and reimbursement. Best practices regarding conflict resolution and ethical practice are also discussed and applied. Students will begin to develop and understand implementation of various business aspects of practice, including business plans, financial management, program evaluation models, and strategic planning. Students will develop an understanding of instructional design and teaching and learning from an academic standpoint.
Prerequisites: OT 311/L, 312/L, 313, and 314

OT 402 Technology in Occupational Therapy
(3 credits - Fall)

The application and implementation of technology within occupational therapy practice is used to adapt and modify occupation for various populations. Students construct custom orthoses to address various human physical needs, understand the scientific principles behind the use of therapeutic modalities and develop the ability to choose and implement the modality as they would in OT practice. The utilization of technology to enhance occupational performance is incorporated across a variety of settings across the lifespan.
Must be taken concurrently with OT 400.
Prerequisites: OT 311/L, 312/L, 313, and 314

OT 414 Fieldwork Ib: Clinical Immersion and Competency (Pediatrics or Psychosocial)
(1 credit - Fall)

The pediatric or psychosocial fieldwork I is directed observation and participation through clinical immersion. Students apply classroom learning pertaining to pediatric or psychosocial issues that limit engagement in occupation. Students participate in client-centered practice with a health care or wellness practitioner to develop professional behaviors and communication skills. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate appropriate competencies for the population.
Prerequisites: OT 311/L, 312/L, 313, and 314

OT 415 Baccalaureate Project I
(3 credits - Fall)

The Baccalaureate Project I course provides an in-depth learning experience in one or more of the following areas: clinical practice skills, administration, leadership, advocacy, and education. The course is founded on an individual or group project, which allows students to demonstrate application of knowledge gained throughout the OTA program. The course provides the students the opportunity to study, in depth, an area of interest. Students work with an assigned faculty advisor to create specific project objectives that are applied in OT 440 Baccalaureate Project II.
Prerequisites: OT 311/L, 312/L, 313, and 314

OT 420 Fieldwork IIa: Clinical Immersion and Competency
(6 credits - Spring)

Fieldwork IIa is an 8-week, full time opportunity to carry out professional responsibilities under the supervision of a qualified occupational therapy practitioner serving as a role model. Students apply occupational therapy theory, research, assessments, treatment interventions, and evidence-based practice in the clinical or community setting to address physical and psychosocial factors.
Prerequisites: OT 400/L, 401, 402, 414, and 415

OT 430 Fieldwork IIb: Clinical Immersion and Competency
(6 credits - Spring)

Fieldwork IIb is an 8-week, full time opportunity to carry out professional responsibilities under the supervision of a qualified occupational therapy practitioner serving as a role model. Students apply occupational therapy theory, research, assessments, treatment interventions, and evidence-based practice in the clinical or community setting to address physical and psychosocial factors.
Prerequisites: OT 400/L, 401, 402, 414, 415, and 420

OT 440 Baccalaureate Project II
(3 credits - Spring)

This course is a continuation of OT 415 Baccalaureate Project I. Students continue to work with their assigned faculty advisor as they further study in depth their area of interest and work toward meeting the objectives of their individual or group project. The course culminates with students providing a presentation of a report of the individual or group project.
Prerequisites: OT 400/L, 401, 402, 414, and 415

OT 490 Independent Study in Occupational Therapy
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

An individualized study of a problem, a research paper or a project related to the occupational therapy field.
Prerequisite: Consent

OT 495 Internship in Occupational Therapy
(2 to 4 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

A cooperative off-campus experience in an occupational therapy-related organization through which curricular knowledge and skills may be actively applied.
Prerequisite: Consent