Christ.  Scholarship.  Service.

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science provides instruction in mathematics, statistics and computer science. Bachelor degrees are available in computer science and in mathematics.

Program in Mathematics

"Mathematics is the language in which God has written the universe." - attributed to Galileo Galilei.

Mathematics, included in the original artes liberales, is valuable for a multitude of reasons - its beauty, which attracted many of humanity's finest minds; its many applications in the sciences; the powers of careful reasoning, which go hand-in-hand with mastering it; its undeniable centrality to modern finance, technology, data analysis and other engines of innovation. A major in mathematics brings this value to the student, from the practical employment value of the mathematical and problem-solving skills developed in the study of mathematics to the decidedly un-practical aesthetic of pure mathematics which has dazzled its practitioners for millennia.

The purposes of the mathematics curriculum at Huntington University are (a) to develop in students the art and skill of careful, clear and creative mathematical thinking and problem-solving; (b) to provide students with a strong foundation in mathematical skills with applications in engineering, computer science, finance and the natural and social sciences; and (c) to provide students with an understanding of the major fields of mathematics and their interrelationships.  Completing a major in mathematics prepares the student for further study of mathematics, including graduate study, for a career (together with the program in education) as a secondary or middle school mathematics educator, and for careers in both public and private sectors which make use of the mathematical sciences.

Students who choose a bachelor of science degree in mathematics, a bachelor of science degree in mathematics education, or a bachelor of arts degree in mathematics will complete MA 165, 171, 172, 205, 273, 481; and CS 111 (or CS 216).

Students who select the bachelor of science degree in mathematics complete, in addition to the common courses above, MA 311, 371, 411, 431, 471; eight hours from MA 210, 321, 351, 450, 461, or CS 325; and four hours from CH 161/L, BI 161/L, or PH 211/L for a total of 53 hours.

Students who select the bachelor of science degree in mathematics education complete, in addition to the common courses above, MA 210, 311, 321, 351, 411, 471; and one course from MA 371, 431, 450, or 461 for a total of 45 hours. Refer to the Department of Education for education courses required for teacher licensing.

Students who select the bachelor of arts degree in mathematics complete, in addition to the common courses above, MA 311 or 371, 411 or 431, and 13 hours from MA 210 and MA 300+ (not included above) for a total of 43 hours.

The minor in mathematics requires MA 165, 171, 172 and 11 hours chosen from MA courses numbered 115 and above or CS 216. For the elective hours, at most four hours can be from courses numbered below 165 and at least three hours must be in a course numbered above 300.

Students preparing for mathematics teacher licensing are encouraged to complete a minor in one of the sciences that will broaden their preparation. See, for example, descriptions of minors in biology and chemistry.

Students who take mathematics or computer science courses must demonstrate satisfactory mathematics placement scores prior to enrolling in their intended mathematics or computer science courses (see Mathematics Placement Testing Policy in Catalog under Admissions Policies and Procedures). In order to satisfy a prerequisite requirement for a mathematics course, a student must earn a grade of C- or better in the prerequisite course.

Program in Computer Science

Students who choose a bachelor of science degree in computer science complete CS 111, 216, 245, 286, 315, 325, 355, 415, 425, 435 and 436; PH 261; and MA 165. Students must also choose one of the following four tracks.

The information systems track requires CS 175; three credits from CS 331, 490, or 495; MA 161 or 171; BA 252; and six hours from AC 241, EB 211, BA 213, 281, or 331.

The mathematics track requires MA 171, 172, and 311; PH 211/L and 212/L.

The digital media track requires CS 175; MA 161 or 171; DM 105, 178, 278, and 378.

The web development track requires CS 175; MA 161 or 171; AR 141, 241I, 241ID, 241P, and 271; and CO 213 or 241.

The minor in computer science requires CS 111, 216, and fifteen hours from any CS course, MA 165, or PH 261 for a total of 22 hours.

Cyber Security Minor

The minor in cyber security provides a focus on cyber security for students interested in career opportunities related to information technology security. The minor complements existing majors in computer science and criminal justice. The cyber security minor requires CJ 345; CS 111, 216, 272, 396 (3 hours), 425; and three hours from CS 175, 355, and 415 to total of 23 hours.

Cyber Security Management Minor

The minor in cyber security management is for students interested in career opportunities related to information technology security. The minor complements existing majors in business, computer science and criminal justice. The cyber security management minor requires BA 252; CJ 345; CS 111, 272, 397; and six hours from BA 331, 431, CJ 105, 111, CS 175, 415, and 425 to total 22 hours.

Forensic Accounting Minor

Students interested in adding a forensic accounting minor may refer to the description in the Department of Business.

Courses in Computer Science

CS 111 Introduction to Computer Science
(4 credits - Fall, Spring)

An introduction to fundamental computer concepts and terminology applicable for communication in today's world. Topics include historical perspective, computer architecture, operating systems, networking, impact of computing on society and current application areas, including spreadsheets, databases, web page development and use of a programming language. Programming topics include input/output, loops, decision structures, arrays and method. Attention is given to good programming style and problem solving techniques for program design, coding, documentation, debugging and testing.
Prerequisite: MA 032 or placement

CS 117 Programming I
(2 credits - Fall, Spring)

An introduction to programming. Topics include input/output, loops, decision structures, arrays and methods. Attention is given to good programming style and problem solving techniques for program design, coding, documentation, debugging and testing.
Meets with CS 111 at times announced by the instructor.
Prerequisite: Consent

CS 175 Web Scripting
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

An introduction to the use of scripting languages for creative interactive Web applications. Topics include client and server scripting, database interaction and Web server management.
Prerequisites: CS 111

CS 216 Programming II
(3 credits - Spring)

Advanced programming topics, including object oriented programming, graphical user interfaces, recursion, fundamental data structures, sorting and searching algorithms, sequential and random access file processing and external procedures.
Prerequisite: CS 111

CS 245 System Analysis and Design Methods
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

Concepts of structured analysis and design, including a systems development life cycle. Techniques such as fact-finding and presentation methods, data flow diagrams, entity-relationship diagrams, hardware/software requirements, feasibility analysis, screen layout, file and database design.
Prerequisite: CS 111

CS 272 Introduction to Cyber Security Management
(3 credits - Fall Even Years)

Introduction to identifying, detecting and preventing computer security threats. Course covers malicious software, encryption, disaster recovery and backup systems, risk analysis and management, legal and ethical issues.
Prerequisite: CS 111

CS 286 Visual Programming
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

Event-driven programming using a visual programming language and interface. Topics include screen design and layout, common controls, graphics and database integration.
Prerequisite: CS 216

CS 315 Computer Architecture and Assembler Language
(4 credits - Fall Even Years)

An introduction to computer architecture and concepts, including programming techniques using an assembler instruction set.
Prerequisite: CS 216

CS 325 Data Structures
(4 credits - Fall Odd Years)

Analysis of algorithms, advanced sorting and searching techniques, vectors, arrays, records, stacks, queues, deques, linked lists, trees and graphs are studied in this course.
Prerequisites: CS 216 and MA 161 and 165

CS 331 Topics in Computer Science
(3 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

Selected issues of current interest such as artificial intelligence, Web site management, robotics and graphics.
Prerequisite: CS 216

CS 355 Operating Systems
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

Role and concepts of operating systems, including file systems, scheduling algorithms, process management, resource management, concurrent processing and principles of operating system design.
Prerequisite: CS 216

CS 395 Practicum in Computer Science
(1 to 3 credits - Fall, Spring)

Practicum in some aspect of computer science designed to give student practical, directed experience.
Prerequisite: Consent

CS 396 Cyber Security Practicum
(3 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

The student will participate in a supervised learning experience in a professional setting related to cyber security such as a local business, non-profit or government organization. A minimum of 120 contact hours must be completed, along with a written report of the experience. Students must fill out an application at least one semester in advance in the Enterprise Resource Center, in coordination with the faculty advisor, and obtain the appropriate background checks.
Prerequisite: CS 272

CS 397 Cyber Security Management Practicum
(3 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

The student will participate in a supervised learning experience in a professional setting related to cyber security management such as a local business, non-profit or government organization. A minimum of 120 contact hours must be completed, along with a written report of the experience. Students must fill out an application at least one semester in advance in the Enterprise Resource Center, in coordination with the faculty advisor, and obtain the appropriate background checks.
Prerequisite: CS 272

CS 415 Database Management Systems
(3 credits - Fall Odd Years)

Defining of data needs, relating those needs to user-oriented data languages and management of data within organizations. Establishing relevance of data structure and file organization techniques. Examining database management functions and systems, logical and physical data models and the management of data as a resource.
Prerequisite: CS 111 (216 recommended)

CS 425 Principles of Networking
(4 credits - Fall Even Years)

Introduction to Local Area Networks and Wide Area Network concepts focusing on the TCP/IP protocol. Introduction to the OSI model, IP routing, switching and addressing standards. Overview of such topics as 802.11 wireless, VLANs and network security.
Prerequisite: CS 111

CS 435 Senior Project I: Analysis and Design
(3 credits - Fall)

An intensive team project involving analysis, design and implementation of a computer-based information system. Focus on the analysis and design system development phases.
Prerequisite: To be taken during the senior or last full year of coursework

CS 436 Senior Project II: Implementation
(3 credits - Spring)

A continuation and completion of the senior project. Focus on the implementation and support phases. The project will terminate with the presentation of results.
Prerequisite: CS 435

CS 490 Independent Study
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

Supervised study of selected topics in computer science at an advanced level.
Prerequisite: Consent

CS 495 Internship in Computer Science
(2 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

A field experience in computer science which provides an opportunity for the student to apply theoretical knowledge in a practical setting. Student maintains close cooperation with the supervisory personnel in the field.
Prerequisite: Consent

Courses in Mathematics

MA 032 Introductory Algebra
(3 credits - Fall, Spring)

This course provides a review of the concepts and techniques of algebra. Students will examine algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, operations with polynomials, factoring polynomials, operations on rational expressions, graphs of equations and inequalities, solving systems of two linear equations, operations on radicals, solving radical equations, and the quadratic formula. This course is offered for non-degree credit.
Prerequisite: Placement

MA 111 Analyzing Arithmetic for Educators
(3 credits - Fall)

In this course, students will develop concepts and topics in elementary and middle school math. Students will study numeration systems, working with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, integers, percents, and proportions. Students will also explore number theory, estimation and beginning algebra concepts. Effective mathematical pedagogy for children will be modeled, emphasizing the development of patterns and relationships, various instructional techniques, and the view of mathematics as problem solving, communicating, reasoning, and making connections.
Prerequisites: Elementary, middle grades or mathematics education major and MA 032 or placement

MA 112 Analyzing Geometry and Statistics for Educators
(3 credits - Spring)

In this course, students will develop concepts and topics in elementary and middle school math. Students will study characteristics of two and three-dimensional shapes, the development of spatial sense, geometry, standard and metric measurement, transformational and coordinate approaches to geometry, data analysis, and probability. Effective mathematical pedagogy for children will be modeled, emphasizing the development of patterns and relationships, the use of various instructional techniques, and the view of mathematics as problem solving, communicating, reasoning, and making connections.
Prerequisites: Elementary, middle grades or mathematics education major and MA 032 or placement

MA 115 Mathematics for Society and the Liberal Arts
(3 credits - Fall)

This course is a survey of mathematics and its applications in contemporary society. Topics will vary and are selected from among the following or from other subjects chosen by the instructor: graph theory, descriptive statistics, voting theory and social choice, information coding, symmetry and patterns, game theory, and financial mathematics.
Prerequisite: MA 032 or placement

MA 141 College Algebra and Trigonometry
(4 credits - Summer)

This course is designed to equip students with the algebra and trigonometry skills necessary for success in physics and calculus courses. Students will study topics such as polynomials, rational functions, exponents, equations, inequalities, graphs, and trigonometric functions of real numbers.
Prerequisite: MA 032 or placement

MA 151 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
(4 credits - Fall, Spring)

This course provides an introduction to elementary probability and statistics. Students will study descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and variability, and use graphs to represent data. Students will explore normal distributions and their applications; probability, including laws of probability and an intuitive introduction to random variables; and inferential statistics, including correlation and regression, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing (z-tests for means and proportions, t-tests, and the chi-square test). Students will also examine experiment and study design, including sources of bias and techniques for minimizing them. Students will learn to recognize the use and misuse of statistics in society and will investigate ways to guard against common statistical mistakes.
Prerequisite: MA 032 or placement

MA 161 Mathematics for Managerial and Social Sciences
(4 credits - Spring)

This course is a survey of mathematical concepts and techniques useful in business and the social sciences. Students will review important concepts from algebra, including functions and linear and quadratic polynomials. Students will explore elementary linear algebra and applications, including systems of linear equations, matrix operations, and linear programming. An intuitive introduction to differential calculus and its applications will also be covered.
Prerequisite: MA 032 or placement

MA 165 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
(3 credits - Fall)

This course is a survey of elementary discrete mathematics and its applications. Students will study topics in the following areas: sets, logic, combinatorics, graph theory, elementary number theory, and recursion. Applications of these topics, especially to computer science, will also be included.
Prerequisite: MA 032 or placement

MA 171 Calculus I
(4 credits - Fall)

This course is the first course of a three-semester calculus sequence. The core of the course is an introduction to differential calculus, including limits, continuity, the derivative, and applications of differentiation. Students will also be introduced to antiderivatives and essential concepts integration, including the fundamental theorem of calculus.
Prerequisite: MA 141 or placement

MA 172 Calculus II
(4 credits - Spring)

This course is the second course of a three-semester calculus sequence. Students will study applications of integration; techniques of integration, including integration by parts and trigonometric substitution; and improper integrals. Students will examine infinite sequences and series, including Taylor series of common functions. Additional topics include further applications of integration, an introduction to differential equations, parametric equations and polar coordinates, and vectors and vector operations.
Prerequisite: MA 171

MA 205 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs
(3 credits - Fall)

This course is an introduction to mathematical proofs and foundational concepts of mathematics. Students will study first-order predicate logic; elementary set theory; types of proofs and proof strategies; methods of formulating and writing proofs; mathematical induction; and applications of proof techniques to problems involving numbers, sets, functions, and relations.
Prerequisite: MA 165 or 171

MA 210 History of Mathematics
(2 credits - January Odd Years)

This course is a survey of the history of mathematics around the world from ancient times up to the present. Students will focus on the development of important mathematical ideas and the key figures in that development. Willingness to engage with mathematics will be needed, but no particular mathematical knowledge is required.

MA 251 Geometry for Middle School Educators
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

This course is a survey of important concepts and topics in geometry. Students will explore geometry as an axiomatic system, advanced theorems in Euclidean geometry, and the essentials of non-Euclidean geometry and other geometries such as projective geometry. Proofs will be used but not emphasized. The course will meet concurrently with MA 351. Credit cannot be earned for both this course and MA 351.
Prerequisite: MA 165 or 171

MA 273 Calculus III
(4 credits - Fall)

This course is the third course of a three-semester calculus sequence. Students will begin the course by reviewing vectors and vector operations. Students will study plane and space curves and the calculus of vector-valued functions as well as differential calculus of functions of several variables, including limits, continuity, partial derivatives, applications of partial derivatives, and techniques such as Lagrange multipliers. Students will study multiple integration, including integration in rectangular, polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates and applications of multiple integrals. Students will also be introduced to vector calculus, including line integrals and Green's theorem. If time permits, students will investigate surface integrals and Gauss's divergence theorem.
Prerequisite: MA 172

MA 295 Practicum in Mathematics
(1 to 3 credits - Fall, Spring)

Students will complete a practicum in some aspect of mathematics designed to give practical, directed experience.
Prerequisite: Consent

MA 311 Linear Algebra
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

This course is an introduction to linear algebra. Students will examine linear transformations, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, abstract vector spaces and applications of linear algebra.
Prerequisite: MA 172 or 205

MA 321 Number Theory
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

This course is a survey of elementary number theory and its applications. Students will study primality and divisors, modular arithmetic and the Chinese remainder theorem, continued fractions and Diophantine equations, Fermat's Little Theorem, Euler's phi function, Hensel's lemma, quadratic reciprocity and other essential concepts of number theory. Students will also discuss applications to computer science, including primality testing algorithms and encryption.
Prerequisite: MA 205

MA 351 Geometry
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

This course is a survey of important concepts and topics in geometry. Students will examine geometry as an axiomatic system, advanced theorems in Euclidean geometry, and the essentials of non-Euclidean geometry and other geometries such as projective geometry. Emphasis is placed on proofs and careful reasoning from axioms.
Prerequisite: MA 205

MA 371 Differential Equations
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

This course is an introduction to ordinary differential equations, their solution methods, and their applications. Students will learn solution methods for first-order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, and systems of first-order differential equations. In addition, students will study numerical and power-series solutions as well as continuous models and applications.
Prerequisite: MA 172

MA 411 Abstract Algebra
(4 credits - Fall Odd Years)

This course is an introduction to the theory of groups, rings, and fields. Students will study group theory, including permutations, subgroups and Lagrange's theorem, and group homomorphisms and the isomorphism theorems. Students will continue by studying ring theory, including ideals and the ring isomorphism theorems, integral domains, and fields. Students will also explore polynomial rings and the factorization of polynomials as well as applications of abstract algebra to number theory. Time permitting, more advanced topics such as the Sylow theorems or unique factorizations may also be covered.
Prerequisite: MA 205

MA 431 Real Analysis
(4 credits - Fall Even Years)

This course is an introduction to real analysis. Students will learn about real topology, including completeness, compactness, and connectedness. Students will also study convergence of sequences and series, limits of functions, continuity, derivatives and differentiability of functions, and sequences and series of functions.
Prerequisites: MA 172 and 205 (MA 273 recommended)

MA 450 Topics in Mathematics
(3 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

Students will examine a selected topic in the area of mathematics. Potential topics include topology, graph theory, combinatorics, partial differential equations, theory of computation, mathematical logic, and others.
Prerequisite: MA 205

MA 461 Mathematical Modeling
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

This course provides an introduction to the modeling of real-world phenomena using mathematics. Students will explore both discrete and continuous models, with subject matter drawn from the natural sciences, social sciences, and finance, depending on the interest of the instructor and students. Some experience with computer programming is recommended.
Prerequisites: MA 371; MA 311 or concurrent

MA 471 Probability and Mathematical Statistics
(4 credits - Spring Odd Years)

This course is an introduction to probability theory and mathematical statistics. Students will study the following topics in probability: basic concepts, including counting arguments, conditional probability, and Bayes' theorem; random variables; distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, including density functions, probability generating functions, and moment generating functions; joint, marginal, and conditional distributions and densities; expected value, variance, and covariance; various important distributions (such as binomial, geometric, negative binomial, uniform, exponential, Poisson, Gaussian, and gamma and beta distributions). Students will study topics in mathematical statistics, including descriptive statistics, distributions of sample statistics, hypothesis testing and parameter estimation, and correlation and regression.
Prerequisites: MA 165 and 273

MA 481 Seminar in Mathematics
(1 credit - Fall)

This course is a capstone seminar course for mathematics and mathematics education majors. Students will discuss various aspects of mathematics and its place in the world, including mathematical history, philosophy of mathematics, the teaching of mathematics, and the intersection of mathematics and the Christian faith. Additionally, students will do independent reading on a mathematical topic of their choice. They will write an expository paper and give a presentation on their chosen topic.
Prerequisite: MA 411 or 431

MA 490 Independent Study
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

This course is a supervised study of selected topics in the mathematical sciences at an advanced level.
Prerequisite: Consent

MA 495 Internship in Mathematics
(2 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

A field experience in mathematics which provides an opportunity for the student to apply theoretical knowledge in a practical setting. Student maintains close cooperation with the supervisory personnel in the field.
Prerequisite: Consent