Instructors: Troy Irick, Amanda Burge, Ann McPherren, Raymond Porter, Anita Wickersham, Brock Zehr

The Business Department seeks to develop students prepared to be effective stewards of the Earth’s physical, human and capital resources. The curriculum has been intentionally designed to integrate Christian perspective and ethical considerations with business theory. While some may consider the pursuit of maximum profit and wealth as prime activities of business, the faculty of the Business Department consider the use of profit and wealth to serve God’s creation to be central to our mission.

The department is committed to helping students develop the skills and abilities necessary to be effective in career and service through the blending of faith, business theory and practice. Students have a wide variety of opportunities to put learning in motion through Huntington University Venutures, Inc. and via internships and other practical experiences.

The department provides opportunities for students to earn a bachelor’s degree in business with majors in accounting, economics and finance, management, marketing, entrepreneurial small business management, or sport management. The department also offers a master in business administration (MBA) degree. More information on the MBA program may be found in the Graduate and Professional Programs Academic Catalog. With careful planning, students may complete an undergraduate business degree and an MBA degree on an accelerated 3 + 2 schedule.

Majors in Business

Students may earn the bachelor of science degree in business in one of six related majors: accounting, economics and finance, management, marketing, entrepreneurial small business management and sport management.

The major in accounting requires AC 241, 242, 341, 342, 361, 362, 371, 441, and 471; BA 252, 351, 421, 481, and AC/BA 495; EB 211 and 212; OA 215 (three credits) or equivalent certificate; and MA 151, and 161 or 171 (calculus recommended for those anticipating graduate school). Many states, including Indiana, require candidates for the CPA examination to have earned 150 semester hours of college level credit and earn a bachelor’s degree prior to sitting for the exam. Students may meet the Indiana requirements at Huntington University in a number of ways. Expanding the above accounting major to include ten additional upper level hours in business, along with a minor, such as marketing, economics or computer science, will fulfill the requirements. Students should meet with their academic advisor to discuss other acceptable courses of study or to review requirements of other states.

The major in economics and finance requires AC 241 and 242; BA 252, 351, 421, 481 and 495; EB 211, 212, and 18 hours from EB 321, 325, 331, 346, 376, 381, 413, 421, 461, HS/PS 342, or other approved EB courses; OA 215 (three credits) or equivalent certificate, and OA 371; and MA 151, and 161 or 171 (calculus recommended for those anticipating graduate school).

The major in entrepreneurial small business management requires BA 211, 232, 252, 281, 301DEP, 301ETL, 301HPT, 331, 374, 384, 395, 431, 454, 481, 495ENT; EB 211, 212 and 325; and MA 151. Elective hours from BA, EB, and AC offerings and HS/PS 342 are available to complement a specific interest within the major.

The major in management requires the completion of AC 241 and 242; BA 252, 281, 331, 351, 421, 431, 461, 481, 495, and three additional hours from BA, EB, and AC offerings or HS/PS 342; EB 211 and 212; OA 215 (three credits) or equivalent certificate, and OA 371; and MA 151, and 161 or 171 (calculus recommended for those anticipating graduate school). 

The major in marketing requires the completion of AC 241 and 242; BA 252, 281, 311, 312, 326, 351, 421, 473, 481, 495; EB 211 and 212; OA 215 (three credits) or equivalent certificate, and OA 371; and MA 151, and 161 or 171 (calculus recommended for those anticipating graduate school) and two courses from CO 331, BA 213, 341 or 461.

The major in sport management requires RC 111; SM121, 316, 395, 411, 461, 496SMAC; AC 241; BA 252, 281, 351; EB 211; and 12 elective hours chosen from BA 213, 311, 312, 431 and EB 212. A grade of B- or higher is required for SM 496SMAC

Students may earn a minor in accounting by completing AC 241, 242, 341 and 342; BA 252; OA 215 (three credits) or equivalent certificate; and MA 161. The minor in economics and finance requires EB 211 and 212; MA 161; and 12 additional hours in economics. The minor in entrepreneurial small business requires BA 222, 232, 252, 281, 431; EB 325; PY 111; and six hours from BA 211, 301ETL, 301HPT, 374, 384, 395, 454, or 495ENT. The minor in management requires BA 252; EB 211; MA 161; six hours from BA 311, 351 and 431; one course from BA 281, 331 and 421; and three additional hours from BA offerings. The minor in marketing requires BA 252, 281, 311, 312, 326, and eight hours of electives from BA 213, 473, CO 331, PY/SO 351 or other approved courses. The minor in sport management requires SM 121, 411, 461, 495 (4 hours); BA 252, 281, 351; and three courses from BA 213, 311, 312; CO 346; EX 318; SM 316 or other approved courses.

Forensic Accounting

The minor in forensic accounting is available to students interested in career opportunities related to preventing and investigating white collar crime. The program is open to students from all majors but may be of particular interest to criminal justice, accounting, business and computer science majors. The forensic accounting minor requires AC 241, 242, 321, 395FA (3 hours); CJ 345; and seven hours from AC 341, 342, 471, BA 252, 331, CS 111, or 272.

Cyber Security Management Minor

Students interested in adding a cyber security management minor may refer to the description in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.

Certificate in Entrepreneurship

The Huntington University Fast Forward Seed Accelerator program offers a 15-hour certificate in entrepreneurship to any enrolled, degree-seeking student as an inter-disciplinary opportunity to any major area of study on campus. The seminar oriented courses in this program have been developed to attract student interest and provide key learning outcomes in the area of entrepreneurship. Students who complete the certificate program (as well as the entrepreneurial small business management major and minor) will receive a blend of foundational coursework geared toward understanding the entrepreneurial environment, creating a business plan, developing strategies, market testing and financing and will also have participated in applied learning experiences. Students may earn a certificate in entrepreneurship by completing nine hours from BA 211, 222, 232, 301DEP, 301ETL, 301HPT, 374, 384, 454, 495ENT; and six hours of practicum experience from BA 395A, 395B, 395L, or 395S. Non-business majors who are participating in the certificate program are strongly encouraged to begin their study by taking BA 211 as their first course.

Haupert Institute for Agricultural Studies

The Haupert Institute for Agricultural Studies promotes a Christian perspective on agriculture, which recognizes our responsibility to be good stewards of God's creation and to examine questions of sustainability and justice. Hallmarks of the institute include outreach to the agribusiness community, internships, connections with organizations that promote agriculture to young people such as 4-H and FFA and opportunities for students in agricultural missions. The Institute offers a major in agricultural education and a major and minor in agribusiness. The agribusiness major offers eight different tracks for students to choose from, including animal production, crop production, communications and public policy, economics and finance, entrepreneurial small business management, management, marketing and ministry and missions.

Students who complete a bachelor of science degree in agricultural education can be licensed in Indiana to teach agriculture in middle school and high school settings. To earn this degree, students complete AG 111, 121, 131, 141, 221/L, 231/L, 241, 251, 331/L, 335/L, 495; four hour elective in Animal or Crop production; BA 232, 252, 343; EB 211; BI 161/L, 321/L; and CH 141/L. The core curriculum course, MA 151, is necessary and will fulfill the mathematical science requirement. Students must also complete the professional education courses required of those wishing to teach at the middle school and high school level including PY 111 to be taken in the freshman year; AE 212, ED 236, AE 296, and SE 234 to be taken in the sophomore year; AE 311, AE 320, ED 364 and ED 395 to be taken in the junior year; ED 410AE, ED 440 and ED 460 during the senior year.

Students may earn the bachelor of science degree in agribusiness by completing AG 111, 221/L, 231/L, 241, 311, 495 (2 hours); BA 232, 252, 343, 421; EB 211, 212; BI 161/L, 321/L; and CH 141/L.  The core curriculum course, MA 151, is necessary and will fulfill the mathematical science requirement. It is suggested that students take PS 111 to fulfill one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum. Students must also complete at least one of the following seven tracks.

The animal production track requires AG 321/L, 323/L (or 365/L), 351/L, and BA 331.

The crop production track requires at least 15 hours from the following: AG 331/L, 341/L, 351/L, 361/L, BA 331.

The communications and public policy track requires at least 15 hours from the following: AR 107, CO 213, 241, 331, 381, DM 155, 281 (or 231), 395, PS 111, 321.

The economics and finance track requires EB 325, 376, 381, 421 and 461.

The entrepreneurial small business management track requires BA 281, 331, 384, 454 and three courses from BA 301.

The management track requires BA 281, 331, 431, 461 and OA 371.

The marketing track requires BA 281, 311, 326, 461 and 473.

The ministry and missions track requires MI 211, 242, 321 and six hours from EB 421, MI 233CO, 233CP, 233LA, 233RS, 233ST, 233UM, 365, 373, 395, 421, or 495.

Students may earn a minor in agribusiness by completing AG 111, 221/L (or 231/L); BA 232, 252, 343; BI 161/L; and CH 141/L. Students are recommended to take EB 211 to fulfill one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum.

 

Courses in Agribusiness

 

Courses in Accounting

 

Courses in Business

 

Courses in Economics and Finance

 

Courses in Office Administration

 

Courses in Recreation Management

 

Courses in Sport Management