Instructors: Terrell Peace, Tyanne Bailey, Susan Boyer, Jennifer French

The Education Department offers majors leading to Indiana teacher licenses in elementary education, elementary special education, middle school education, secondary education and all-grade education. The department also offers Master of Education degree programs (see Graduate and Adult Studies).

Huntington University’s teacher education program is accredited by the State of Indiana, and teacher education majors leading to licensure are approved by the Indiana Department of Education. Many surrounding states have cooperative agreements with Indiana that allow individuals with Indiana licenses to be licensed to teach in those states. Huntington University is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

The goal of the Education Department is to develop teachers who are effective stewards. Stewardship is a biblical concept that fits well with our mandate from the state of Indiana to prepare students for the teaching profession. In the parable of the talents (Matthew 25), Jesus portrays stewards as individuals who are given responsibility for the growth and development of someone else’s assets. The state of Indiana will give graduates of our teacher preparation programs responsibility for the growth and development of one of its most precious assets – its school children.

Teachers act as stewards in four areas. First, as stewards of knowledge, teachers are responsible to society and the culture at large to transmit and make understandable the growing knowledge base that comprises school curricula. Second, as stewards of learner development, teachers have a responsibility to parents and to the students themselves to guide learners in their intellectual, social, emotional and moral development. Third, as stewards of classroom and school environments, teachers have a responsibility to administrators, parents and the community to provide the best possible conditions for student learning. Finally, as stewards of instruction, teachers have a responsibility to teach the various disciplines with the most effective methods and with integrity and thoroughness.

These four areas of stewardship correspond to and support national and state teaching standards. Huntington University teacher education graduates understand the conceptual framework provided by this “Teacher As Effective Steward” model (see Student Handbook or department Web page for further explanation of the department’s conceptual framework and model). Additionally, Huntington University teacher education graduates are effective communicators in spoken and written language and are thoroughly grounded in both general education and the content of the subject areas they will be teaching.

Assessment Checkpoints

The Teacher Education Program relies on continuous assessment and includes three checkpoints.

Checkpoint 1: Admission to the Program. Occurring in the sophomore year, students apply to be admitted into the Teacher Education Program. To apply to the program, students submit an application package that includes: references, autobiography, evidence of experience with children or youth and a statement of experience with diversity. No later than the fall semester of the sophomore year, students must register to take all sections of the Indiana Core Academic Skills Assessment (CASA) as part of the application to the Teacher Education Program. To be accepted into the program, CASA scores of 220 in each of the writing, mathematics, and reading test must be achieved. Licensing requirements provide the following exceptions to taking the CASA test: If a candidate has a documented ACT score of 24 or higher (including Math, Reading, Grammar and Science Reading) OR an SAT score of 1100 or higher (including Critical Reading and Math), CASA is waived. Admission to the program also requires a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above for all college level work; a major GPA of 2.5 or above; a successful interview; successful acceptance of application; positive recommendations; and approval of the Teacher Education Committee (TEC). Successful completion of this checkpoint is required prior to enrolling in junior level methods courses.

Checkpoint 2: Application for Student Teaching. Normally, occurring during the junior year, but no later than one academic year prior to student teaching, this checkpoint consists of three parts: evidence of successful field placement (including a check of Dispositional Evaluations from field experience teachers), good academic standing and application. The application consists of the actual application to student teach along with a written philosophy of education. Prior to actual placement, candidates must have, at minimum, registered for the respective Indiana CORE Assessment tests as required by the state of Indiana for their content area(s).

Checkpoint 3: Culmination. Occurring during the final week of student teaching, Checkpoint 3 includes an exit interview with the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) which provides the needed evidence of professional proficiencies and reflections on professional growth. The University supervisor conducts the interview. Satisfactory portfolio and TWS evaluations are required.

Recommendation for state licensing is made only when a student has (a) successfully completed all phases of training, (b) received a 2.5 cumulative GPA and 2.5 GPA in the licensing area, (c) received a C+ or higher in student teaching, (d) received no grade less than C- in any course required for licensing and (e) passed the Indiana CORE Assessment exam(s) required for each licensing area.

Major in Elementary Education

This major is designed for students wishing to prepare for teaching in an elementary school setting. Required professional education courses for the major in elementary education are ED 212, 236, 242, 272, 295, 316, 332, 336, 362, 377, 382, 384, 386, 388, 395, 397, 398, 420, 440 and 450; SE 232 and 325; and either HS 211 or 212. As part of the general education program, the student must complete two of BI 111/L, CH 111/L or PH 111/L; MA 111 and 112; and PY 111.

The Indiana Department of Education requires elementary education majors to have an additional content area in their degree program. Students may fulfill this requirement by completing a dual licensure program (recommended) or by completing one of the special concentrations listed below.

Dual Licensure Majors:

Any elementary education major completing one of the dual licensure programs (Special Education, English as a New Language and Middle School Education) described in the following sections fulfills the concentration requirement by completing additional course work in another content area.

Major in Elementary and Special Education

This major is designed for students who are interested in being able to teach at the elementary level (K-6) in both special education and regular classroom settings. Students who complete this major will be eligible for the regular elementary as well as special needs: mild intervention at the elementary level. Required professional education courses for the major in elementary and special education are ED 236, 242, 272, 295, 316, 332, 336, 377, 382, 384, 386, 388, 395, 397 or 398, 420, 440 and 450 (seven weeks); SE 232, 233, 325, 328, 397, 422, 424, 434, and 450 (seven weeks); and either HS 211 or 212. As part of the general education program, the student must complete two of BI 111/L, CH 111/L or PH 111/L; MA 111 and 112; and PY 111. The junior block practicum and the student teaching experience (14 weeks) are divided equally between a regular classroom and a special education setting.

Major in Elementary Education and Teaching English Learners

This major is designed for students wishing to prepare for teaching in an elementary school setting (typically grades K-6) and work in specialized EL programs in P-12 classrooms. Required professional education courses for the major in elementary education and teaching English Learners (ELs) are ED 212, 236, 242, 272, 295, 316, 332, 336, 362, 377, 382, 384, 386, 388, 397, 398, 420, 440 and 450; SE 232 and 325; TE 233, 234, 235 and 395; CO 322/MI 321; and either HS 211 or 212. As part of the general education program, the student must complete two of BI 111/L, CH 111/L or PH 111/L; MA 111 and 112; and PY 111.

Majors in Elementary and Middle School Education

These majors are designed for students wishing to prepare for teaching in the elementary grades and at the middle school level (typically grades K-9). Students completing one of the majors will take: ED 212, 236, 242, 272, 295, 311, 316, 332, 336, 362, 377, 382, 384, 386, 388, 395, 397, 398, 420, 440, and 450 or 460; SE 232 and 325; either HS 211 or 212; and courses to complete one of the following: To complete the content area in Middle School Language Arts, students will complete ED 332, 336; EN 121, 151; two courses from EN 311, 321 and 455; CO 215; and ED 273. To complete the content area in Middle School Mathematics, students complete MA 111, 112, 151, 165, 171 and 251. To complete the content area in Middle School Science, students complete BI 111/L; CH 111/L; PH 111/L; and two of PH 271, BI 241/L, BI 271, BI 422/L, CH 141/L, or ES 211/L. To complete the content area in Middle School Social Studies, students complete HS 115, 116, 211, 212, 261; PY 111; two from EB 211, SO 111, SO 141, or PS 111. As part of the general education program, each student must complete two of BI 111/L, CH 111/L or PH 111/L; MA 111 and 112; and PY 111.

Non-Teaching Content Areas:

Huntington University offers five special concentrations from which elementary education majors may choose. These concentrations do not add additional teaching certification to the elementary license.

For Elementary Education: Language Arts Concentration, students will complete EN 121, 151; CO 215; ED 272, 273, 384; and one course from among EN 311, 321 or 455.

For Elementary Education: Mathematics Concentration, students will complete MA 111, 112, 115, 151; ED 388; and one course from among MA 141, 161, 165 or CS 111.

For Elementary Education: Science Concentration, students will complete BI 111/L; CH 111/L; PH 111/L; ED 386; and two courses from among PH 271, ES 211/L, BI 241/L, 271, or 422/L.

For Elementary Education: Social Studies Concentration, students will complete HS 115, 116, 211, 212; ED 382; PY 111; and two courses from among EB 211, HS 261, PS 111, SO 111 or SO 141.

For Elementary Education: Fine Arts Concentration, students will complete AR 115, 212; MU 115; TH 115; one credit hour of Creative Studio Arts; and six additional hours from among AR 101, 107, 225, TH 212, and any MU A or MU P course for which the prerequisites are met.

Majors in Secondary Education: Middle School and High School Education

Majors for which students may be licensed to teach at the middle school and high school level (typically grades 5-12) include biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, social studies, and visual arts. Candidates completing the social studies program can be licensed in geographical perspectives, government and citizenship and historical perspectives. Students in the social studies program can also complete additional coursework to add licensing in economics, psychology and sociology. The requirements for completion of the University major are available in the catalog sections for the respective subject area departments.

Professional education courses required of those wishing to teach at the middle school and high school level include PY 111 to be taken in the freshman year; ED 212, 236, 296, and SE 234 to be taken in the sophomore year; ED 311, 320, 364 and 395 to be taken in the junior year (English education majors must also take ED 273); ED 410 (subject specific), ED 440 and 460 during the senior year. For professional education courses required for those wishing to teach visual arts at the middle school and high school level, see the catalog section for the Department of Visual Arts.

Majors in All-Grade Education

Professional education courses required for those seeking P-12 licensing in music or visual arts, include PY 111 to be taken in the freshman year; ED 212, 236, and SE 232 or 234 to be taken in the sophomore year; either ED 362 or 364 and 395 to be taken in the junior year; and ED 440, and 450 or 460 during the senior year. Students in the music education major also complete MU 234, MU 325, and either MU 427 or MU 429.

Professional Semester for Student Teaching

Students must plan schedules carefully in order that the final semester may be devoted to the student teaching experience. Students must make application for placement in student teaching during the first semester of the junior year.

To be allowed to student teach, students must have success-fully completed Checkpoints 1 and 2. Students enrolled in the professional semester should not take any other courses or be involved in other experiences that may detract from student teaching.

The student teaching experience necessarily follows the schedule of the school where the teaching is being done rather than the University calendar. Students must make arrangements for their own transportation and adjust to the school’s schedule as they move into the role of teaching professionals.

Students who wish to pursue careers teaching in overseas schools are encouraged to apply for an additional student teaching experience overseas through the Christian College Teacher Education Coordinating Council. Applications are due in the fall of the junior year. Further information about this program is available in the Education Department Office.

Minor in Exceptional Populations

The minor in exceptional populations offers students an opportunity to receive knowledge, understanding and experience working with exceptional populations. Students who complete the minor are trained to work with exceptional populations in agencies outside the school system such as churches, mental health agencies, social service agencies, etc.  Students may earn a minor in exceptional populations by completing 22 hours from the following courses: SE 111, 232, 233, 234, 328, 424, 434; ED 236 and 395SP.

Certification in Teaching English Learners (ELs)

Any education major may add an additional certification in teaching English Learners (ELs) to their teacher’s license. The certification in teaching ELs will equip graduates to work more effectively with ELs in their classrooms or to work in specialized EL programs in a P-12 setting. The certification in teaching ELs is a teacher licensing program that is only available for teacher education majors. Currently licensed teachers may also add the certification in teaching ELs to their existing license. To receive certification in teaching ELs, students must complete TE 233, 234, 235, 395 (replaces ED 395) and CO 322/MI 321. (See Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages for course descriptions.)

 

Courses in Education

 

Courses in Special Education