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Department of Education

The Education Department offers majors leading to Indiana teacher licenses in elementary education, secondary education, and all-grade education, as well as dual licensure programs in elementary and special education (P-12), elementary and teachers of English Learners, and elementary and middle school education. The department also offers Master of Education degree programs (see Graduate and Professional Programs).

Huntington University’s teacher education program is accredited by the State of Indiana, and teacher education majors leading to licensure are approved by the Indiana Department of Education. Many surrounding states have cooperative agreements with Indiana that allow individuals with Indiana licenses to be licensed to teach in those states. Huntington University is currently accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) through 2020 and will be seeking accreditation through the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), the successor to NCATE, in the future.

The goal of the Education Department is to develop teachers who are effective stewards. Stewardship is a biblical concept that fits well with our mandate from the state of Indiana to prepare students for the teaching profession. In the parable of the talents (Matthew 25), Jesus portrays stewards as individuals who are given responsibility for the growth and development of someone else’s assets. The state of Indiana will give graduates of our teacher preparation programs responsibility for the growth and development of one of its most precious assets – its school children.

Teachers act as stewards in four areas. First, as stewards of knowledge, teachers are responsible to society and the culture at large to transmit and make understandable the growing knowledge base that comprises school curricula. Second, as stewards of learner development, teachers have a responsibility to parents and to the students themselves to guide learners in their intellectual, social, emotional, and moral development. Third, as stewards of classroom and school environments, teachers have a responsibility to administrators, parents and the community to provide the best possible conditions for student learning. Finally, as stewards of instruction, teachers have a responsibility to teach the various disciplines with the most effective methods and with integrity and thoroughness.

These four areas of stewardship correspond to and support national and state teaching standards. Huntington University teacher education graduates understand the conceptual framework provided by this “Teacher as Effective Steward” model (see Student Handbook or department Web page for further explanation of the department’s conceptual framework and model). Additionally, Huntington University teacher education graduates are effective communicators in spoken and written language and are thoroughly grounded in both general education and the content of the subject areas they will be teaching.

Assessment Checkpoints

The Teacher Education Program relies on continuous assessment and includes three checkpoints.

Checkpoint 1: Admission to the Program. Occurring in the sophomore year, students apply to be admitted into the Teacher Education Program. To apply to the program, students submit an application package that includes: references, autobiography, evidence of experience with children or youth, and a statement of experience with diversity. No later than the fall semester of the sophomore year, students must register to take all sections of the Indiana Core Academic Skills Assessment (CASA) as part of the application to the Teacher Education Program. To be accepted into the program, CASA scores of 220 in each of the tests (writing, mathematics, and reading) must be achieved. Licensing requirements provide the following exceptions to taking the CASA test: If a candidate has a documented ACT score of 24 or higher (including Math, Reading, Grammar and Science Reading) OR an SAT score of 1170 or higher (including Critical Reading and Math), CASA is waived. Admission to the program also requires a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above for all college level work; a major GPA of 2.5 or above; a successful interview; successful acceptance of application; positive recommendations; and approval of the Teacher Education Committee (TEC). Successful completion of this checkpoint is required prior to enrolling in junior level methods courses.

Checkpoint 2: Application for Student Teaching. Normally, occurring during the junior year, but no later than one academic year prior to student teaching, this checkpoint consists of three parts: evidence of successful field placement (including a check of Dispositional Evaluations from field experience teachers), good academic standing, and application. The application consists of the actual application to student teach along with a written philosophy of education. Prior to actual placement, candidates must have, at minimum, registered for the respective Indiana CORE Assessment tests as required by the state of Indiana for their content area(s).

Checkpoint 3: Culmination. Occurring during the final week of student teaching, Checkpoint 3 includes an exit interview with the Teacher Work Sample (TWS) which provides the needed evidence of professional proficiencies and reflections on professional growth. The University supervisor conducts the interview. Satisfactory TWS and student teaching evaluations are required.

Recommendation for state licensing is made only when a student has (a) successfully completed all phases of training, (b) received a 2.5 cumulative GPA and 2.5 GPA in the licensing area, (c) received a C+ or higher in student teaching, (d) received no grade less than C- in any course required for licensing, and (e) passed the Indiana CORE Assessment exam(s) required for each licensing area.

Students who wish to prepare for education-related occupations other than teaching may, with permission of the director of teacher education, do so by substituting designated courses for those in the licensing program and completing a major in education (for elementary education majors) or the secondary subject area.

Major in Elementary Education

This major is designed for students wishing to prepare for teaching in an elementary school setting. Required professional education courses for the major in elementary education are ED 212, 236, 242, 272, 295, 316, 332, 336, 362, 377, 382, 384, 386, 388, 395, 397, 398, 420, 440, and 450; SE 232 and 325; and either HS 211 or 212. As part of the general education program, the student must complete BI 111/L; PH 111/L; FA 234; MA 111 and 112; and PY 111.

The Indiana Department of Education requires elementary education majors to have an additional content area in their degree program. Students may fulfill this requirement by completing a dual licensure program (recommended) or by completing one of the special concentrations listed below.

Dual Licensure Majors:

Any elementary education major completing one of the dual licensure programs (Special Education (P-12), Teachers of English Learners, and Middle School Education) described in the following sections fulfills the concentration requirement by completing additional course work in another content area.

Major in Elementary and Special Education (P-12)

This major is designed for students who are interested in being able to teach at the elementary level (K-6) in a regular classroom setting and also be able to work with exceptional students at any grade level. Students who complete this major will be eligible for the regular elementary license (K-6) as well as special needs: mild intervention license (P-12). Required professional education courses for the major in elementary and special education are ED 236, 242, 272, 295, 316, 332, 336, 377, 382, 384, 386, 388, 395, 397 or 398, 420, 440 and 450 (seven weeks); SE 232, 233, 325, 328, 397, 422, 424, 434, and 450 or 460 (seven weeks); and either HS 211 or 212. As part of the general education program, the student must complete BI 111/L; PH 111/L; FA 234; MA 111 and 112; and PY 111. The junior block practicum and the student teaching experience (14 weeks) are divided equally between a regular classroom and a special education setting.

Major in Elementary Education and Teaching English Learners

This major is designed for students wishing to prepare for teaching in an elementary school setting (typically grades K-6) and work in specialized EL programs in P-12 classrooms. Required professional education courses for the major in elementary education and teaching English Learners (ELs) are ED 212, 236, 242, 272, 295, 316, 332, 336, 362, 377, 382, 384, 386, 388, 397, 398, 420, 440, and 450; SE 232 and 325; TE 233, 234, 235, and 395; CO 322/MI 321; and either HS 211 or 212. As part of the general education program, the student must complete BI 111/L; PH 111/L; FA 234; MA 111 and 112; and PY 111.

Majors in Elementary and Middle School Education

These majors are designed for students wishing to prepare for teaching in the elementary grades and at the middle school level (typically grades K-9). Students completing one of the majors will take: ED 212, 236, 242, 272, 295, 311, 316, 332, 336, 362, 377, 382, 384, 386, 388, 395, 397, 398, 420, 440, and 450 or 460; SE 232 and 325; either HS 211 or 212; and courses to complete one of the following: To complete the content area in Middle School Language Arts, students will complete ED 332, 336; EN 121, 151; two courses from EN 311, 321, and 455; CO 215; and ED 273. To complete the content area in Middle School Mathematics, students complete MA 111, 112, 151, 165, 171, and 251. To complete the content area in Middle School Science, students complete BI 111/L; CH 111/L; PH 111/L; and two of PH 271, BI 241/L, BI 271, BI 422/L, CH 141/L, or ES 211/L. To complete the content area in Middle School Social Studies, students complete HS 115, 116, 211, 212, 261; PY 111; two from EB 211, SO 111, SO 141, or PS 111. As part of the general education program, each student must complete BI 111/L; PH 111/L; FA 234; MA 111 and 112; and PY 111.

Non-Teaching Content Areas:

Huntington University offers five special concentrations from which elementary education majors may choose. These concentrations do not add additional teaching certification to the elementary license.

For Elementary Education: Language Arts Concentration, students will complete EN 121, 151; CO 215; ED 272, 273, 384; and one course from among EN 311, 321, or 455.

For Elementary Education: Mathematics Concentration, students will complete MA 111, 112, 115, 151; ED 388; and one course from among MA 141, 161, 165, or CS 111.

For Elementary Education: Science Concentration, students will complete BI 111/L; CH 111/L; PH 111/L; ED 386; and two courses from among PH 271, ES 211/L, BI 241/L, 271, or 422/L.

For Elementary Education: Social Studies Concentration, students will complete HS 115, 116, 211, 212; ED 382; PY 111; and two courses from among EB 211, HS 261, PS 111, SO 111, or SO 141.

For Elementary Education: Fine Arts Concentration, students will complete AR 115, 212; FA 234; MU 115; TH 115; and six additional hours from among AR 101, 107, 225, TH 212, and any MU A or MU P course for which the prerequisites are met.

Majors in Secondary Education: Middle School and High School Education

Majors for which students may be licensed to teach at the middle school and high school level (typically grades 5-12) include agricultural, biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, social studies, and visual arts. Candidates completing the social studies program can be licensed in geographical perspectives, government and citizenship and historical perspectives. Students in the social studies program can also complete additional coursework to add licensing in economics, psychology and sociology. The requirements for completion of the University major are available in the catalog sections for the respective subject area departments.

Professional education courses required of those wishing to teach at the middle school and high school level include PY 111 to be taken in the freshman year; ED 212, 236, 296, and SE 232 to be taken in the sophomore year; ED 311, 320, 364, and 395 to be taken in the junior year (English education majors must also take ED 273); ED 410 (subject specific), ED 440, and 460 during the senior year. For professional education courses required for those wishing to teach visual arts at the middle school and high school level, see the catalog section for the Department of Visual Arts.

Majors in All-Grade Education

Professional education courses required for those seeking P-12 licensing in music or visual arts, include PY 111 to be taken in the freshman year; ED 212, 236, and SE 232 to be taken in the sophomore year; either ED 362 or 364 and 395 to be taken in the junior year; and ED 440, and 450 or 460 during the senior year. Students in the music education major also complete MU 234, MU 325, and either MU 427 or MU 429.

Professional Semester for Student Teaching

Students must plan schedules carefully in order that the final semester may be devoted to the student teaching experience. Students must make application for placement in student teaching during the first semester of the junior year.

To be allowed to student teach, students must have success-fully completed Checkpoints 1 and 2. Students enrolled in the professional semester should not take any other courses or be involved in other experiences that may detract from student teaching.

The student teaching experience necessarily follows the schedule of the school where the teaching is being done rather than the University calendar. Students must make arrangements for their own transportation and adjust to the school’s schedule as they move into the role of teaching professionals.

Students who wish to pursue careers teaching in overseas schools are encouraged to contact the Education Department Office for more information.

Minor in Exceptional Populations

The minor in exceptional populations offers students an opportunity to receive knowledge, understanding, and experience working with exceptional populations. Students who complete the minor are trained to work with exceptional populations in agencies outside the school system such as churches, mental health agencies, social service agencies, etc.  Students may earn a minor in exceptional populations by completing 22 hours from the following courses: SE 111, 232, 233, 328, 422, 434; ED 236 and 395SP; and PY 321.

Certification in Teaching English Learners (ELs)

Any education major may add an additional certification in teaching English Learners (ELs) to their teacher’s license. The certification in teaching ELs will equip graduates to work more effectively with ELs in their classrooms or to work in specialized EL programs in a P-12 setting. The certification in teaching ELs is a teacher-licensing program that is only available for teacher education majors. Currently licensed teachers may also add the certification in teaching ELs to their existing license. To receive certification in teaching ELs, students must complete TE 233, 234, 235, 395 (replaces ED 395), and CO 322/MI 321. (See Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages for course descriptions.)

Courses in Education

ED 195 Job Shadow in Education
(1 to 2 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

Students observe the daily routines and activities of employed professionals and see how skills and knowledge acquired in class are applied in the education field.
Prerequisite: Consent

ED 212 Introduction to Education
(2 credits - Fall, Spring)

The historical, philosophical and sociological foundations of education are explored in this course. The effects that theoretical developments and research have on curriculum and the role of the teacher are studied. Students are introduced to the Teacher as Effective Steward" model and encouraged to develop their own philosophy of education in response to that model."
This course must be taken before the junior year.

ED 236 Educational Psychology
(3 credits - Fall, Spring)

Applications of theories of teaching, learning, development and measurement to classroom environments are explored. This course also examines qualities of classroom interaction, particularly related to instructional processes, motivation of students and classroom management.
Identical with PY 236.
Prerequisite: PY 111

ED 242 Early Childhood Development
(3 credits - Fall)

This course is an introduction to professional preparation for teaching in the early childhood setting. The student will explore the ethical standards for the profession, issues related to the developmental needs of the young child and the skills that are necessary for working in this setting.
Prerequisite: PY 111 or 211

ED 272 Literature for Children
(2 credits - Fall)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the various types of children's books. The uses of these books as an integral part of the school curriculum in grades K-6 are explored. Methods for discovering and developing student interest are stressed through practice in storytelling, oral reading and dramatization.
Prerequisites: ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 273 Adolescent Literature
(3 credits - Fall Even Years)

This course acquaints students with various types of literature for adolescents, theories of supporting reading in secondary classrooms and using reading as a communication device. The course addresses literacy issues, required vs. open reading, pleasure reading and methods for integrating reading into the secondary curriculum.
Prerequisite: ED 236

ED 295 Sophomore Practicum for Elementary Education
(1 credit - Fall, Spring)

Students will do at least 30 hours of observation and participation in a K-6 classroom. Reflections related to these classroom experiences will be required.
Prerequisites: ED 212 or ED 236 or SE 232 or concurrent

ED 296 Sophomore Practicum for Secondary Education
(1 credit - Fall, Spring)

Students will do at least 30 hours of observation and participation in a middle school or high school classroom. Reflections related to these classroom experiences will be required.
Prerequisites: ED 212 or ED 236 or SE 232 or concurrent

ED 311 Early Adolescent Curriculum and Methodology
(3 credits - Fall)

This course, first in a sequence of secondary methods, addresses adolescent development along with an introduction to the concept of cultural proficiency. Middle school philosophy and curriculum provides the context for developing instructional strategy, traditional assessment forms and techniques for enhancing secondary reading. A 30-hour field experience is required.
Prerequisites: ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 316 Early Childhood Methods and Materials
(2 credits - Spring)

This course explores methods and strategies appropriate for the earl childhood setting. Selection, organization and use of materials will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: ED 236, 242 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 320 Adolescent Curriculum and Methodology
(3 credits - Spring)

This course gives the secondary education candidate experience developing instructional strategies appropriate for high school curriculum with an emphasis on performance based learning and assessment. In addition, classroom management, student learning style, writing across the curriculum, along with further exploration of cultural proficiency will be addressed.
Prerequisites: ED 311 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 332 Fundamentals of Reading
(3 credits - Fall)

This is a course designed to introduce the various reading approaches that are found in the classroom. Principles, practices and problems will be addressed. Emphasis will be on knowledge of phonics, textbooks and various reading programs that students will encounter as they teach in the early and middle childhood settings.
Prerequisites: ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 336 Diagnostic and Corrective Reading
(3 credits - Spring)

The reading difficulties of individuals are studied, with attention placed on the administration and interpretation of classroom assessment measures. Emphasis is given to addressing the needs of all readers in the classroom.
Prerequisites: ED 332 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 362 Assessment Strategies for Elementary Educators
(2 credits - Fall)

This course will focus on helping teacher candidates for grades K-9: understand and use appropriate assessment strategies; develop the ability to collect and use assessment data as a means of improving student learning; be familiar with the administration and use of common national, state and local standardized assessment measures.
Prerequisites: ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 364 Assessment Strategies for Secondary Educators
(2 credits - Fall)

This course will focus on helping teacher candidates for grades 5-12: understand and use appropriate assessment strategies; develop the ability to collect and use assessment data as a means of improving student learning; be familiar with the administration and use of common national, state and local standardized assessment measures.
Prerequisites: ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 377 Integration of Technology in the Classroom
(2 credits - Fall, Spring)

Students consider theories and rationale for integration of technology within the classroom. Emphases are on integrated lesson planning, technological adaptation for students with exceptionalities, in addition to further development of the candidates' technological knowledge and skills applicable to the teaching profession.

ED 382 Social Studies Methods and Materials
(2 credits - Fall)

Consideration is given to the aims, content and organization of social studies concepts appropriate for the elementary school student. Unit and daily lesson planning, as well as exploration of textbooks and other resources, is emphasized.
Prerequisites: ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 384 Language Arts Methods and Materials
(2 credits - Fall)

This course acquaints students with various methods and materials for the teaching of functional and creative writing, handwriting, grammar, punctuation and spelling in elementary school settings. Exploration of language development, oral composition and listening skills is included.
Prerequisites: ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 386 Science Methods and Materials
(2 credits - Spring)

Students learn to use discovery techniques as part of an integrated approach to the teaching of topics in physical, biological and earth conservation sciences. The use of trade books, visuals and commercial curriculum projects is explored.
Prerequisites: BI 111/L or CH 111/L or PH 111/L; ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 388 Mathematics Methods and Materials
(2 credits - Spring)

Students learn to use problem solving, communication, reasoning and connections as part of an integrated approach to the teaching of elementary school mathematics. Learning resources, including trade books, textbooks, manipulatives, computer curriculum resources and teacher-made instructional aids, are explored.
Prerequisites: MA 111 or MA 112, ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 395 Multicultural Practicum in Teaching
(3 credits - January)

This course provides a pre-student teaching experience working in a public school. Placements are in multicultural settings in an urban area. Observing, participating and a limited amount of supervised classroom teaching are expected. Required seminars focus on education in multicultural settings. Students are expected to have extended field experiences at all levels of their licensing and this practicum can help fulfill that requirement. Taken during January of the junior year.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 395EL Multicultural Practicum in Elementary
(3 credits - January)

This course provides a pre-student teaching experience working in a public school. Placements are in elementary classrooms in multicultural settings in an urban area. Observing, participating and a limited amount of supervised classroom teaching are expected. Required seminars focus on education in multicultural settings. Students are expected to have extended field experiences at all levels of their licensing and this practicum can help fulfill that requirement. Taken during January of the junior year.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 395HS Multicultural Practicum in High School
(3 credits - January)

This course provides a pre-student teaching experience working in a public school. Placements are in high school classrooms in multicultural settings in an urban area. Observing, participating and a limited amount of supervised classroom teaching are expected. Required seminars focus on education in multicultural settings. Students are expected to have extended field experiences at all levels of their licensing and this practicum can help fulfill that requirement. Taken during January of the junior year.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 395MI Multicultural Practicum in Middle School
(3 credits - January)

This course provides a pre-student teaching experience working in a public school. Placements are in middle school classrooms in multicultural settings in an urban area. Observing, participating and a limited amount of supervised classroom teaching are expected. Required seminars focus on education in multicultural settings. Students are expected to have extended field experiences at all levels of their licensing and this practicum can help fulfill that requirement. Taken during January of the junior year.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 395SE Multicultural Practicum in Special Education
(3 credits - January)

This course provides a pre-student teaching experience working in a public school. Placements are in special education and multicultural settings in an urban area. Observing, participating and a limited amount of supervised classroom teaching are expected. Required seminars focus on education in multicultural settings. Students are expected to have extended field experiences at all levels of their licensing and this practicum can help fulfill that requirement. Taken during January of the junior year.
Prerequisites: Junior standing and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

ED 395SP Special Populations Practicum
(1 to 3 credits - January)

This course provides experience observing and working with exceptional populations in one of a variety of settings relevant to student interest. Taken during January of the junior or senior year.
Prerequisites: SE 232 and 233

ED 396 Practicum in Education
(1 to 3 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

Practicum in some aspect of education designed to give student practical, directed experience.
Prerequisite: Consent

ED 397 Junior Block Practicum I
(3 credits - Fall)

An extensive, four-week, all morning field experience in a K-6 classroom for those students in the fall methods block (ED 272, 382, 384). This field experience will take place during the last four weeks of the semester.
Prerequisites: ED 272, 382, and 384 concurrent

ED 398 Junior Block Practicum II
(3 credits - Spring)

An extensive, four-week, all morning field experience in a K-6 classroom for those students in the spring methods block (ED 316, 386, 388). This field experience will take place during the last four weeks of the semester.
Prerequisites: ED 386, 388, and SE 325 concurrent

ED 399 Workshop in Education
(1 to 3 credits - Summer)

Special topics in education for teachers and other professional educators.
Prerequisite: Consent

ED 410AE Agricultural Education Curriculum and Methodology
(2 credits - Fall)

This seminar, designed as the agricultural education candidate's final preparation prior to student teaching, integrates specific course content with field based assignments. Instructional strategies appropriate for both middle and high school are reinforced and applied within the cooperating classroom. Emphasis on agricultural education/IDOE standards, national teacher standards and respective professional organizations as well as the three-part agricultural education program model, including classroom and lab learning, FFA and SAEs. A 30-hour field experience is required. This field experience will be completed in 30 consecutive one-hour observations in the same class, culminating in at least ten consecutive days of teaching.
Prerequisite: AE 320

ED 410ENG Language Arts/English Curriculum and Methodology
(2 credits - Fall)

This seminar, designed as the secondary candidate's final preparation prior to student teaching, integrates specific course content with field based assignments. Instructional strategies appropriate for both middle and high school are reinforced and applied within the cooperating classroom. Emphasis on language arts/English IDOE standards, national teacher standards and respective professional organizations will be included. A 30-hour field experience is required. This field experience will be completed in 30 consecutive one-hour observations in the same class, culminating in at least five consecutive days of teaching.
Prerequisite: ED 320

ED 410MAT Mathematics Curriculum and Methodology
(2 credits - Fall)

This seminar, designed as the secondary candidate's final preparation prior to student teaching, integrates specific course content with field based assignments. Instructional strategies appropriate for both middle and high school are reinforced and applied within the cooperating classroom. Emphasis on mathematics IDOE standards, national teacher standards and respective professional organizations will be included. A 30-hour field experience is required. This field experience will be completed in 30 consecutive one-hour observations in the same class, culminating in at least five consecutive days of teaching.
Prerequisite: ED 320

ED 410SCI Science Curriculum and Methodology
(2 credits - Fall)

This seminar, designed as the secondary candidate's final preparation prior to student teaching, integrates specific course content with field based assignments. Instructional strategies appropriate for both middle and high school are reinforced and applied within the cooperating classroom. Emphasis on science IDOE standards, national teacher standards and respective professional organizations will be included. A 30-hour field experience is required. This field experience will be completed in 30 consecutive one-hour observations in the same class, culminating in at least five consecutive days of teaching.
Prerequisite: ED 320

ED 410SOC Social Studies Curriculum and Methodology
(2 credits - Fall)

This seminar, designed as the secondary candidate's final preparation prior to student teaching, integrates specific course content with field based assignments. Instructional strategies appropriate for both middle and high school are reinforced and applied within the cooperating classroom. Emphasis on social studies IDOE standards, national teacher standards and respective professional organizations will be included. A 30-hour field experience is required. This field experience will be completed in 30 consecutive one-hour observations in the same class, culminating in at least five consecutive days of teaching.
Prerequisite: ED 320

ED 420 Managing the Learning Environment
(2 credits - Fall)

Students will investigate a number of different theories and techniques which will enable them to develop strategies for maintaining a successful teaching and learning environment. Emphasis will be on positive classroom management as well as planning for discipline.
Prerequisite: SE 325 or MI 221

ED 440 Topics and Problems in Education
(2 credits - Fall, Spring)

Current issues, teaching techniques, classroom management and other topics which change in response to trends in education will be discussed. This course is taken during the student teaching semester and includes initial and final professional portfolio assessments.
Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program and approved application for student teaching

ED 450 Student Teaching in Elementary Schools
(10 credits - Fall, Spring)

All-day classroom experience in local elementary schools for 14 weeks. The student teacher is supervised by a cooperating master teacher and a supervisor from Huntington University. Overseas and special education student teaching experiences involve additional placements and reduction of time and credit for ED 450 experience. Students teaching overseas will spend seven weeks in an ED 450 placement for five credit hours and seven weeks overseas (ED 455) for five credit hours. Special education student teachers will spend seven weeks in an ED 450 placement for five credit hours and seven weeks in a special education setting (SE 450 or 460) for five credit hours.
Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program, approved application for student teaching, and appropriate Indiana Core Assessment scores

ED 455 Student Teaching in Elementary Schools Overseas
(5 credits - Fall, Spring)

All-day classroom experience in an overseas elementary school for up to seven weeks. This experience is to be paired with a seven-week experience in ED 450 (five credit hours).
Prerequisites: ED 450 (concurrent) and consent

ED 460 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools
(10 credits - Fall, Spring)

All-day classroom experience in local secondary schools for 14 weeks. The student teacher is supervised by a cooperating master teacher and a supervisor from Huntington University. Overseas student teaching experiences involve additional placements and reduction of time and credit for ED 460 experience. Students teaching overseas will spend seven weeks in an ED 460 placement and seven weeks overseas (ED 465).
Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program, approved application for student teaching, and appropriate Indiana Core Assessment scores

ED 465 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools Overseas
(5 credits - Fall, Spring)

All-day classroom experience in an overseas secondary school for up to seven weeks. This experience is to be paired with a seven-week experience in ED 460 (five credit hours).
Prerequisites: ED 460 (concurrent) and consent

ED 490 Independent Study
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

An individualized study of a problem, a research paper or a project related to the education field.
Prerequisite: Consent

ED 495 Internship in Education
(2 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

A field experience in education which provides an opportunity for the student to apply theoretical knowledge in a practical setting. Student maintains close cooperation with the supervisory personnel in the field.
Prerequisite: Consent

Courses in Special Education

SE 111 American Sign Language I
(3 credits - Fall)

This course will introduce the student to American Sign Languages (ASL). It will explore the history and culture behind the language and will cover proper fingerspelling and signing techniques, as well as signing etiquette. A great deal of time will be spent learning vocabulary and practicing ASL in a conversational setting. This course is directed toward students with no previous experience with, or knowledge of, ASL.

SE 195 Job Shadow in Special Education
(1 to 2 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

Students observe the daily routines and activities of employed professionals and see how skills and knowledge acquired in class are applied in the special education field.
Prerequisite: Consent

SE 232 Education of the Exceptional Learner
(3 credits - Fall, Spring)

This course provides an overview of the developmental, behavioral, intellectual and educational characteristics of students with disabilities. Early intervention, identification and placement as well as appropriate adaptations for diverse learners in inclusive classroom settings will be emphasized. In addition, the special methodologies related to the instruction of gifted and talented students are addressed.
Identical with PY232.
Prerequisite: PY 111

SE 233 Foundations of Special Education
(3 credits - Spring)

This course focuses on special education as a profession. Emphasis will be placed on historical, philosophical and legal foundations of special education. The rights and responsibilities of parents, students, educators and other professionals as these relate to students with exceptional needs will also be studied. Programming options and ethical practices for mild interventions will be emphasized.
Identical with PY 233.
Prerequisite: PY 111

SE 325 Differentiated Instruction
(2 credits - Spring)

Explores how teachers can develop responsive, personalized and differentiated classrooms by attending to the learning needs of diverse individuals. Students will learn to develop multiple avenues to learning for student growth and success.
Prerequisites: ED 236 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

SE 328 Behavior Management for Mild Intervention
(2 credits - Fall)

This course focuses on planning and managing the teaching and learning environment for students with mild disabilities. The use of functional behavioral assessment and its use in developing behavior intervention plans for students with mild disabilities will be explored. Legal implications, including applicable laws, rules and regulations regarding the dissemination and implementation of behavior plans, will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on strategies to foster and teach social skills to those students with mild disabilities.
Prerequisite: ED 236

SE 395 Practicum in Special Education
(1 to 3 credits - Fall, Spring)

Practicum in some aspect of special education designed to give student practical, directed experience.
Prerequisite: Consent

SE 397 Special Education Junior Block Practicum
(3 credits - Fall, Spring)

An extensive, four-week, all morning field experience in a K-6 special education setting for those students in the methods block. This field experience will take place during the last four weeks of the semester.
Prerequisites: SE 232 and 233; concurrent with the junior block methods

SE 422 Methods for Exceptional Learners: Mild Intervention
(3 credits - Fall)

Emphasis in this course will be on characteristics of children who have mild disabilities and the methods and materials used for intervention. A variety of strategies that facilitate student success in the least restrictive environment will be discussed. Additionally, modifying curriculum and environments to ensure student success will be stressed. The use of direct instruction and assessment of instruction to plan instructional objectives for the exceptional learner will be discussed along with the connection between daily planning and the individual education plan.
Prerequisites: SE 233 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

SE 424 Assessment Strategies for Exceptional Learners: Mild Intervention
(3 credits - Fall)

This course focuses on the multiple forms of assessment and record keeping. Emphasis will be placed on selection, use and interpretation of a wide variety of formal and informal assessments and effective ways of communicating that information to parents and colleagues. Additional emphasis will be placed on using assessment to plan, modify and deliver instruction. The relationship between assessment, placement and individual education plans will be explored.
Prerequisites: ED 236, SE 233 and acceptance into the Teacher Education Program

SE 434 Collaboration and Consultation in Special Education
(3 credits - Fall)

This course focuses on communication and collaborative partnerships that will contribute to success for the exceptional child across the full spectrum of services available for mild intervention. Emphasis is placed on the importance of ongoing relationships between the special educator and parents, families and agencies to support the education of the child. The process of conducting team meetings and ethical considerations dealing with confidential information will be explored.
Prerequisite: SE 233

SE 450 Student Teaching in Elementary: Special Education Setting
(5 credits - Fall, Spring)

All day experience in a special education setting for seven weeks (to be paired with a seven-week experience in ED 450). The student teacher is supervised by a cooperating master teacher and a supervisor from Huntington University.
Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program, completion of mild intervention content coursework, approved application for student teaching, and appropriate Indiana Core Assessment scores

SE 460 Student Teaching in Secondary: Special Education Setting
(5 credits - Fall, Spring)

All day experience in a special education setting for seven weeks (to be paired with a seven-week experience in ED 450). The student teacher is supervised by a cooperating master teacher and a supervisor from Huntington University.
Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program, completion of mild intervention content coursework, approved application for student teaching, and appropriate Indiana Core Assessment scores

SE 490 Independent Study in Special Education
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

An individualized study of a problem, a research paper or a project related to the special education field.
Prerequisite: Consent

SE 495 Internship in Special Education
(2 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

A field experience in special education which provides an opportunity for the student to apply theoretical knowledge in a practical setting. Student maintains close cooperation with the supervisory personnel in the field.
Prerequisite: Consent