Christ.  Scholarship.  Service.

Department of Nursing

Nursing is a scholarly discipline that focuses on the Christian practice of compassionate care and service. Nursing, as a caring science and a healing art, assists individuals to manage their responses to health-related issues using a holistic approach. Nurses are advocates and health educators for patients, families and communities. Nurses care for people of all ages helping them to regain and maintain health. These services are provided in a variety of practice settings.

The mission of the Department of Nursing is to provide a baccalaureate educational program of excellence that prepares professional nurses for the diversity in health care needs of the twenty-first century. The Huntington University baccalaureate program in nursing is built upon a strong liberal arts foundation and Christian principles. The program will prepare a generalist who is a competent practitioner, who provides holistic care that contributes to safe and high quality outcomes and who is a critical thinker and a leader. Graduates will impact their world through service.

The baccalaureate degree in nursing at Huntington University is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, 202-887-6791. Huntington University is also accredited by the Indiana State Board of Nursing, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Department of Nursing: Educational Philosophy and Purpose

The faculty of the Department of Nursing at Huntington University believes that learning is a dynamic, interactive process that fosters the maturation of students. This maturation is built upon the values of excellence, creativity, spirituality, human dignity, collaboration and integrity. The faculty is committed to excellence in teaching, scholarship and service that enhances student learning, which positively affects the health and wellness outcomes of individuals, families and communities.

The upper division nursing major is developed from a strong foundation in the liberal arts, sciences and religious thought. The faculty is committed to providing settings for learning in which students can appreciate the contributions of the discipline of nursing to improving the quality of health care. Nursing is based on caring and compassion.

Faculty works in partnership with students to facilitate learning and is responsible to provide a learning environment that promotes inquiry and creativity. Students are responsible to be involved in learning, to identify their goals, to become skilled and knowledgeable and to propose new ideas. Learning is a continuous process. Learning environments should be flexible, interactive and promote mutual growth of faculty and students.

Consistent with the University philosophy, the faculty of the Department of Nursing encourages students to develop their faith, to interpret fields of learning from a Christian perspective, to commit themselves to Christ as Savior and Lord and to develop traits of Christian character and service.

Bachelor’s Program Outcomes

The program, in reflecting the University’s mission, prepares a nurse graduate who:

  1. Practices within the profession’s ethical and legal framework and a Christian worldview; 
  2. Applies the appropriate theories and research from the disciplines of nursing, liberal arts, sciences and religious thought; 
  3. Provides competent nursing care that contributes to safe and high quality outcomes of individuals and communities; 
  4. Commits to scholarship for the improvement of nursing practice at the local, regional, national and international levels; 
  5. Values the roles of the competent professional nurse who is a critical thinker, educator, consultant, advocate, collaborator, leader and researcher; 
  6. Recognizes that continued professional competency, service to others, personal achievement and professional accomplishment require a commitment to life-long learning; 
  7. Examines how the roles of holistic nursing, culture, personal biases and management of resources influence patient care; 
  8. Demonstrates effective communication as a leader and change agent in the ever-changing health care environment.

Admission to the Nursing Program

Admission to the nursing major is competitive. Students admitted to the nursing major are granted clinical placement if they progress through the major by meeting the requirements designated for admission to the nursing clinical portion of the program. Please contact the Department of Nursing for further information.

Course Requirements for the Nursing Major

Students who select nursing as a major in the bachelor of science in nursing degree complete NU 110, 210, 300, 305, 310, 315, 320, 330, 335, 340, 345, 350, 440, 450, 451, 460, 465, 485; BI 232/L, 242/L; and PY 230 for a total of 66 hours in the major. The following specific courses will be necessary in order to fulfill requirements in the Core Curriculum: BI 241/L, CH 141/L; MA 151; SO 111; PY 111; and BT 333TB. Nursing majors may repeat science and math courses only once and remain eligible to enter the nursing program.

A grade of “C” or higher is required in each of the following courses: EN 121; CO 215; CH 141/L; PY 111 and 230; SO 111; MA 151; BI 232/L, 241/L and 242/L. Please refer to the Nursing Student Handbook for course GPA requirements within the nursing major.

Courses in Nursing

NU 110 Basic Nursing Concepts
(1 credit - Spring)

This course introduces nursing majors to the terminology and abbreviations used in the practice environment. A systematic approach will be used to assist in understanding the relationship of the terms to the body and disease process. Students learn the terminology necessary to communicate in an interprofessional milieu.
Prerequisite: Declared major in nursing or consent

NU 210 Basic Nursing Skills
(1 credit - Fall)

Nursing majors will be introduced to the basic nursing skills necessary to care for patients in the healthcare environment. Skills will be demonstrated, practiced and validated in the Nursing Simulation and Resource Center.
Prerequisite: NU 110 or consent

NU 295 Practicum in Nursing
(1 to 3 credits - Fall, January, Spring)

Practicum in some aspect of nursing designed to give student practical, directed experience.
Prerequisite: Consent

NU 300 Pharmacology
(3 credits - Fall)

This course focuses on the essentials of the human body's reaction to drugs and the effects of drugs on the body. In addition, the impact of using over-the-counter medications, herbal and other supplements is included. The nurses' role in medication administration and patient/client teaching is emphasized.
Prerequisite: NU 310

NU 305 Pathophysiology
(3 credits - Fall)

This course will use the general principles covered in anatomy and physiology as they apply to the disease process. The impact of environment, culture, nutrition and genetics in the development of diseases is also discussed.
Prerequisites: BI 232/L and NU 310 or admission to the OTA program

NU 310 The Discipline of Professional Nursing
(1 credit - Spring)

This course introduces the student to the profession of nursing (e.g., the educational, service and scholarship components). Content includes the roles and responsibilities of the professional nurse, the evolution of modern nursing and the science that underpins nursing practice, the nursing process, informatics, legal issues and political issues. The issues surrounding such topics as licensure dilemmas and the impaired nurse will be reviewed. APA format will be introduced.
Prerequisites: NU 110 and 210, or consent

NU 315 Health Assessment
(3 credits - Fall)

This course focuses on the data collection component of the nursing process. Students gather information relevant to identification of client problems - across the lifespan. A client assessment includes psychosocial, physical, family, environmental, spiritual, cultural and nutritional perspectives and the appropriate interpretation of the information collected. The impact of technology on assessment is discussed. Students gain proficiency in assessment skills, including therapeutic communication, interview, observation/inspection, percussion, auscultation and palpation, by working with peers and clients in the Nursing Laboratory and various other settings.
Prerequisites: NU 310 and PY 230

NU 320 Fundamental Skills
(3 credits - Fall)

This course focuses on understanding the theoretical frameworks that are foundational to basic nursing care competencies. In addition, the practical application of those competencies is considered, including the impact of technology. Topics include patient/client safety, standard precautions, hand washing, medication administration, etc. Students work with peers and clients in the Nursing Laboratory as well as in a variety of settings.
Prerequisites: NU 210 and 310

NU 330 Adult Health I
(5 credits - Spring)

This course presents a comprehensive approach to the use of the nursing process in the management of the most common conditions encountered by adults. Students identify patient problems, develop a plan of care, determine interventions and appropriate outcomes. Evaluation of the effect of interventions on outcomes is also included. Students will apply previously and currently learned material to the care of clients/patients in a variety of health care settings.
Prerequisites: NU 300, 305, 315, and 320

NU 335 Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing Care
(4 credits - Fall, Spring)

This course introduces the student to concepts of mental health and mental illness, including the relevant theories and therapies. The course content focuses on therapeutic communication, anxiety, depression, grief and stress related problems commonly found in acute care settings. Selected psychobiological problems, from moderate to severe, are examined using the nursing process as a framework. Understanding the effect of culture and worldviews on psychobiological problems is included. Students apply knowledge and skills in working with clients/patients in various settings.
Prerequisites: NU 300, 305, 315, and 320

NU 340 Nursing Care of Developing Families
(4 credits - Fall, Spring)

This course will use the nursing process framework, students continue development of assessing and caring skills with new mothers, babies and families as the focus. The concepts of family, culture, nutrition, client teaching, communication, spirituality and critical thinking are integrated throughout the course. There is an emphasis on community and home care to reflect the shift from hospital care to home and other settings. Using the knowledge and skills gained, students work with new mothers, babies and families in various health care settings.
Prerequisites: NU 300, 305, 315, and 320

NU 345 Nursing Care of Children
(4 credits - Fall, Spring)

This course, using the nursing process and emphasizing problem identification, care planning and intervention, focuses on health promotion as well as the specific health problems encountered by children and adolescents. The role and influence of family, culture and nutrition are emphasized. Chronic illnesses, spirituality, disability and end-of-life issues are also included. Students have the opportunity to apply what they have learned in caring for children in a variety of healthcare settings.
Prerequisites: NU 300, 305, 315, and 320

NU 350 Interprofessional Research
(2 credits - Fall)

This course reviews research concepts and methods. There is an emphasis on evidence-based practice in nursing. For example, students learn how to frame clinical questions in ways that help distinguish between strong and weak evidence, weigh the risks and benefits of the findings and apply the evidence with patients to improve outcomes.
Prerequisite: NU 330 or admission to the OTA program

NU 395 Practicum in Nursing
(1 to 3 credits - Fall, January, Spring)

Practicum in some aspect of nursing designed to give student practical, directed experience.
Prerequisite: Consent

NU 440 Adult Health II
(5 credits - Fall)

This course builds on the concepts learned in Adult Health I; i.e., a comprehensive approach to the use of the nursing process. Content in the management of the common conditions encountered by adults is continued, along with the introduction of conditions that are of increasing complexity. Students continue developing their abilities to identify patient problems, developing plans of care and determining interventions and appropriate outcomes. The course emphasizes the intervention and evaluation components of the nursing process. Students apply previous and current skills and knowledge with patients/clients in acute care settings as well as selected additional healthcare settings.
Prerequisite: NU 330

NU 450 Nursing Care of the Community
(4 credits - Fall, Spring)

This course provides a foundation of community and public health nursing concepts. Health promotion and disease prevention concepts are integrated such that students learn to develop interventions for individuals, families and communities. The multidimensional role of population-focused, community-focused nursing practice, as well as global health, is discussed. Critical thinking and problem solving skills are emphasized as well as the public health nurse's role in disaster management. Students will apply knowledge and skills related to community and public health nursing with groups in community settings.
Prerequisites: NU 300, 305, 315, and 320

NU 451 Seminar in Nursing
(2 credits - Spring)

This course focuses on preparation for NCLEX-RN exam. Students take exams containing questions representative of the NCLEX-RN. Topics will include how to prepare for the exam, applying for state licensure, legal and ethical issues associated with licensure and the impact of licensure on health care delivery systems and patient care.
Prerequisites: NU 345, 350, 440 and 450

NU 460 Adult Health III
(5 credits - Spring)

This course builds on Adult Health I and II and integrates the concepts of family, culture, nutrition, client teaching, communication and critical thinking in the application of the nursing process for patients with multiple and complex health problems. Students will apply the knowledge and skills from this course in the critical care clinical settings.
NU 460 meets the first 10 weeks of the semester. Students must successfully complete NU 460 before taking NU 485, which meets the last 5 weeks of the semester.
Prerequisites: NU 345, 350, 440 and 450

NU 465 Leadership in Nursing
(3 credits - Spring)

This course deals with leadership concepts and their application to the discipline of nursing. For example, health care organizations, leadership theory, decision making and conflict management, delegation, motivation, managing change, managing resources, power and politics. The course examines nursing theories and facilitates understanding of professional leadership behavior. Students will be required to demonstrate knowledge acquired in the course through a Leadership in Nursing Project.
Prerequisites: NU 345, 350, 440 and 450

NU 485 Role Transition
(3 credits - Spring)

Students, under the guidance of nursing faculty and a preceptor, have the opportunity to integrate what they have learned in the practice of nursing and to apply this knowledge in the role of a beginning professional nurse. They develop outcomes, as well as the means of accomplishing and evaluating the outcomes, for the experience. Clinical sites will be determined by nursing faculty in collaboration with community agencies. Students will complete 144 clinical hours.
NU 485 meets the last 5 weeks of the semester. Students must successfully complete NU 460, which meets the first 10 weeks of the semester, before taking NU 485.
Prerequisites: NU 345, 350, 440, 450 and 460

NU 490 Independent Study
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, January, Spring)

An individualized study of a problem, a research paper or a project related to the nursing field.
Prerequisite: Consent

NU 495 Internship in Nursing
(2 to 4 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

A cooperative off-campus experience in the nursing field through which curricular knowledge and skills may be actively applied.
Prerequisite: Consent