Christ.  Scholarship.  Service.

Department of Christian Thought and Practice

The department of Christian Thought and Practice seeks to prepare men and women with foundational competencies and commitments in Bible, Christian theology, Church leadership, and practical ministry skills through both liberal arts and professional majors. The curriculum is designed to help students examine and deepen their faith commitments, sharpen their capacity for verbal and written communication, develop the skills necessary for leading others in growing faithfulness to God, and strengthen the virtues required for service of Jesus Christ and His Church.

A liberal arts major leading to a bachelor of arts degree in Bible and theology will provide excellent preparation for students who plan to attend graduate school or a theological seminary after graduation. Those whose work will involve interpretation of the Bible, theological and doctrinal reasoning and understanding of the Christian tradition may also choose this major, as it includes courses in the Bible and its interpretation, biblical languages, systematic theology, archaeology, and Christian doctrine.

Students preparing for ministry leadership may select a professional major leading to a bachelor of science degree in children’s ministry, missions, special needs ministry, worship leadership or youth ministries or a liberal arts major leading to a bachelor of arts degree in Christian ministries. These majors include a curriculum that values critical thinking, problem solving, creativity and change, and are designed to integrate biblical truth, evangelical theology, Church history, leadership, teaching, and ministry skills and methodology.

Recognizing that effective participation in God's kingdom often requires wide-ranging skills and experiences and that God's call leads people into diverse professions and vocations, the department encourages students to consider a second major. Many double major combinations are possible, especially for those electing a liberal arts major in Bible and theology or Christian ministries. Students may elect a double major within the department only if there are twelve or more distinct hours between their chosen majors.

The professional ministry majors also include a significant number of courses in Bible and theology, allowing for the addition of a minor in Bible and theology with one to two additional courses in most cases. The department also welcomes those students who wish to enrich their own lives or serve as ministry volunteers, even though they do not plan to enter full-time Christian service.

The PRIME Experience (Required for all Bachelor of Science Majors in Christian Thought and Practice)

PRIME is an acronym for Practical Research and Immersion in Ministry Effectiveness. Students who elect one of the professional majors in the bachelor of science degree participate in this intensive internship as part of their curricular plan. These students must arrange their schedules carefully in order that the summer and fall immediately following the junior year may be devoted to this field ministry immersion. Students should make application for placement in The PRIME Experience during the second semester of the sophomore year. To be allowed to participate in the field ministry immersion, students must maintain a GPA of 2.67 (B-) in their majors, an overall GPA of 2.0, and demonstrate local church and ministry involvement while pursuing their degrees. They must also have completed all courses required in their major except for MI 481. In addition, they must demonstrate evidence of Christian character suitable to a beginning ministry leader. Students enrolled in this internship should not take any other courses or be involved in co-curricular or other experiences that may detract from the overall ministry immersion experience. Students must make arrangements for their own transportation in consultation with their professor. Host ministry sites will be chosen in part for their ability to help facilitate living arrangements during the experience.

Students who elect the major in Bible and theology pursuing the bachelor of arts degree will complete a minimum of 42 hours, including BT 231, 241, 251, 261, 271, 341, 414, and 415; nine hours from BT 441, 442, 443, 445, 446, 447; six hours from GR 111 and 121 or HE 111 and 121; and three hours from BT 320, 331, or 333CCT.

Students majoring in Bible and theology are provided the option of including a semester of study in Israel at Jerusalem University College in either the junior or senior year. By taking an approved list of courses at these Institutes they can receive credit for 15-16 semester hours toward the bachelor of arts degree and will also be given credit for one of the three required January Term experiences.

Students who elect the Christian ministries major pursuing the bachelor of arts degree complete MI 211, 221, 242, 251, 331, 373, 411, 421, 481, 495; BT 414 and 415. In addition to the introductory Bible course counted in the core (chosen from BT 111, 231, 241, 251 or 261), students must also complete one course from BT 231/BT 241 and one course from BT 251/BT 261. Five additional elective hours must be selected from MI 304, 314, 365, 376, 377, or 381 for a total of 48 hours. BT 271 is taken as a prerequisite for MI 421.

Students who elect the professional children’s ministry major pursuing the bachelor of science degree complete MI 211, 221, 242, 251, 331, 373, 381, 411, 421, 471, 481, 496; BT 414, 415; ED 420; and SE 232. In addition to the introductory Bible course counted in the core (chosen from BT 111, 231, 241, 251 or 261), students must also complete one course from BT 231/BT 241 and one course from BT 251/BT 261 for a total of 63 hours in the major. BT 271 is taken as a prerequisite for MI 421.

Students who elect the professional missions major pursuing the bachelor of science degree complete MI 211, 221, 233 (2 hours), 242, 251, 321, 331, 365, 373, 411, 421, 471, 481, 496; BT 331, 414 and 415. In addition to the introductory Bible course counted in the core (chosen from BT 111, 231, 241, 251 or 261), students must also complete one course from BT 231/BT 241 and one course from BT 251/BT 261 for a total of 66 hours in the major. BT 271 is taken as a prerequisite for MI 421. Students who graduate with a major in missions are permitted to request transcripts with educational ministries-cross-cultural studies as the alternate name for the major.

Students who elect the professional special needs ministry major pursuing the bachelor of science degree complete MI 211, 221, 251, 331, 373, 376 or 381, 421, 471, 481, 496; BT 414. In addition to the introductory Bible course counted in the core (chosen from BT 111, 231, 241, 251 or 261), students must also complete one course from BT 231/BT 241 and one course from BT 251/BT 261. Students are also required to complete the following courses in special education: SE 232, 233, 328, 422, 434, and 495 (two or three hours) for a total of 65-66 hours.

Students who elect the professional worship leadership major pursuing the bachelor of science degree complete MI 211, 221, 251, 264, 304, 314, 344, 373, 471, 481, 496; BT 414 and 415. In addition to the introductory Bible course counted in the core (chosen from BT 111, 231, 241, 251 or 261), students must also complete one course from BT 231/BT 241 and one course from BT 251/BT 261. Students are also required to complete the following courses in music: MU 110, 111; MU A06; and seven additional credits from MU 320, 338, A01, A02, A03, A08, A10, up to 2 credits of any choral or instrumental ensemble, or MI 495 for a total of 66 hours.

Students who elect the professional youth ministries major pursuing the bachelor of science degree complete MI 211, 221, 242, 251, 331, 373, 376, 377, 411, 421, 471, 481, 496: BT 414 and 415. In addition to the introductory Bible course counted in the core (chosen from BT 111, 231, 241, 251 or 261), students must also complete one course from BT 231/BT 241 and one course from BT 251/BT 261 for a total of 61 hours in the major. BT 271 is taken as a prerequisite for MI 421.

The minors in the Christian Thought and Practice department require 22-24 hours of coursework in order to fulfill the requirements. The minor in Bible and theology requires 24 hours, including BT 231, 241, 251, 261, 271, 414, and six additional electives from other BT courses. The Christian ministries minor requires 22 hours, including MI 211, 242, 373, 411, 421, 495 (two hours) and five additional hours in the department (not including MI 285). The missions minor requires 22 hours, including MI 211, 233, 242, 321, 365, 373, 495 (two hours), and three additional hours from BT 331 or ministry courses in the department (not including MI 285). The youth ministries minor requires 22 hours, including MI 211, 242, 373, 376, 377, 421 and 495 (four hours). The worship studies minor requires 22 hours, including MI 211, 264, 304, 314, 344, 373, 495 (two hours), and three additional hours in the department (not including MI 285).

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Students of any major may choose to complete a certificate or minor in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Graduates with a bachelor’s degree and an institutionally-issued TESOL certificate or minor are qualified to teach English in many other countries, as well as in community and church-based programs in the United States. (See Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages for more information and course descriptions.)

Courses in Bible and Theology

BT 111 Biblical History and Literature
(3 credits - Fall, Spring)

A survey of the Bible with emphases on its nature and authority; its historical, cultural and religious backgrounds; its historical development; its types of literature; and its content and major themes.
Does not count in the Bible and theology major.

BT 231 Old Testament Introduction I
(3 credits - Fall)

A literary introduction to the Pentateuch and books of poetry and a study of their content. An emphasis on dealing with problems of interpretation and using an analytical, expository approach for the study of selected passages.

BT 241 Old Testament Introduction II
(3 credits - Spring)

A literary introduction to the books of history and the prophets, a study of the content of these books and a discovery of the prophetic view of history. An emphasis on dealing with problems of interpretation and using an analytical, expository approach for the study of selected passages.

BT 251 New Testament Introduction I
(3 credits - Fall)

A general introduction to the study of the New Testament, featuring the historical, literary and cultural backgrounds of first century Judaism, the formation of the Gospels, modern criticism of the Gospels, an introduction to each of the Gospels and a survey of the life of Jesus.

BT 261 New Testament Introduction II
(3 credits - Spring)

A general introduction to the study of the New Testament, featuring the historical, literary and cultural backgrounds of the Greco-Roman world, the history of the early church throughout the first century, Gnosticism, the life of Paul and an introduction to Acts, the New Testament epistles and Revelation.

BT 271 Biblical Interpretation
(3 credits - Spring)

A study of the science of biblical interpretation employing inductive Bible study techniques. Emphasis is placed upon the adaptation of methods to various types of literary genre, the analysis of structural arrangement, word studies and principles of practical application. Students will do exegetical notebooks on selected passages.
Prerequisite: BT 111 or 231 or 251

BT 311 Topics in Biblical Studies
(3 credits - Fall, Spring)

The study of a selected book or literary unit of the Bible, examining its historical, literary, theological and practical significance.
May be repeated for credit in different topics.

BT 311APO Apocalyptic Literature
(3 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

An examination of selected Apocalyptic texts of both the Old and New Testaments that refer to the coming Kingdom of God accompanied by future cataclysmic events. This course will also deal with non-biblical texts written during the intertestamental period that likewise spoke of future eschatological events.

BT 311GOS The Gospels
(3 credits - Spring Every Three Years)

A study of the Gospels and the Life of Christ.
Next offering: Spring 2021

BT 311HIP New Testament Historical and Prophetic Literature
(3 credits - Spring Every Three Years)

A study of either Acts or Revelation.
Next offering: Spring 2023

BT 311HIS Historical Literature
(3 credits - Spring Every Three Years)

A study of the historical books of the Hebrew Bible.
Next offering: Spring 2022

BT 320 Biblical Archaeology
(3 credits - Fall)

An introduction to biblical archaeology and geography from the prehistory of Israel to the end of New Testament times. The major emphasis is on the relevance of archaeology for understanding the Bible.
Prerequisite: BT 111 or 231 or 251

BT 331 Religions of the World
(3 credits - Fall, Spring)

Religion as a universal phenomenon is discussed. The major religions of antiquity and modernity are discussed, with special reference to similar and disparate features.
Prerequisite: One course in Bible

BT 333 Topics in Theological Studies
(3 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

A detailed examination of a selected topic in theology and religion.
May be repeated for credit in different topics.

BT 333CCT Contemporary Christian Theology
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

How does Christian theology engage what matters most to us in our world today? This course pursues that question with specific reference to developments in contemporary theology. Topics may include contemporary perspectives on the interpretation of Scripture, non-Western theologies of Jesus, the environment, human disability, race and gender.
Prerequisite: PL 220 or 260

BT 333GE God and Ethics
(3 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

God and Ethics addresses the following questions: Is God necessary for morality? If yes, what is God's relationship to morality? If no, what kind of morality can exist without a God? Do ethical systems have to be separate from a God? Are there objective moral truths if there is no God? As part of this course, students will discuss the voluntarist/intellectualist debate regarding the nature of God, how Christians have argued for the existence of God based on the existence of values like good and evil and what makes a life meaningful.
Identical with PL 333GE.
Prerequisite: PL 220 or 260

BT 333PT Philosophical Theology
(3 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

Provides an advanced study of what philosophers and theologians have said about the nature of God. The course includes a discussion of the historical development of the "God" concept from the pre-Socratics through its apex in classical theism to the critique of this concept in modern atheism. The tools of contemporary analytic philosophy will be utilized to examine specific attributes of God.
Identical with PL 333PT.
Prerequisites: One course in Bible and PL 220 or 260

BT 333TB Theological Bioethics
(3 credits - Spring)

Covers biblical and theological bases for bioethics and develops in students the skills for ethical decision making and action. The course will help students to conceptualize the differences between Christian approaches and general or philosophical approaches to bioethics while introducing students to contemporary issues in biological, health care and medical ethics.
Prerequisites: BT 111 or other introductory Bible course and major in exercise and movement science, sports and exercise studies, occupational therapy assistant or nursing

BT 341 History of Christianity
(3 credits - Fall)

This course is a survey of Christian history from the close of the New Testament to the present. It will focus on major doctrinal developments and the origins of the currently existing varieties of Christianity.
Prerequisite: HS 115

BT 395 Field Work
(1 credit - Fall, Spring)

A course in practical field work involving a specific responsibility in a local church or other community institution in which the student implements principles of biblical interpretation. May be repeated for four credits total; graded as internship.
Prerequisites: BT major with one year of Bible and sophomore standing

BT 414 Systematic Theology I
(3 credits - Fall)

Systematic theology is the craft of studying Christian beliefs (doctrines), their interrelationship to one another and their application to the Christian life. This course concentrates on the beliefs arising from the first portion of the Apostles Creed: God the Creator and His triune life, Creation, the human person and sin. It also considers the nature and tasks of theology more generally, its sources and norms.
Prerequisites: MI 285 and BT or MI major

BT 415 Systematic Theology II
(3 credits - Spring)

This course focuses on the final two areas of confession in the Apostles Creed: Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit. Doing so involves consideration of matters related to Christ's person and work (Christology), the Spirit's activity in the church (Pneumatology, Ecclesiology, Scripture and the Christian Life), and the consummation of history (Eschatology).
Prerequisite: BT 414

BT 440 Religion and Scientific Thought
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

This course provides a study of the nature of scientific thought and scientific method, consideration of historical and contemporary views concerning the relationship between science and religion and of current issues resulting from the interaction of modern science and the Christian worldview.
Identical with PL 440.
Prerequisite: PL 220 or 260

BT 460 Philosophy of Religion
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

A consideration of various attempts to provide a philosophical formulation and defense of the basic tenets of the theistic worldview, with particular attention to recent analytic philosophy.
Identical with PL 460.
Prerequisite: PL 220 or 260

BT 490 Independent Study
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

The study of a problem, a research paper or a project related to the Bible and theology major.
Prerequisite: Consent

Advanced Biblical Literature

BT 441 The Pentateuch
(3 credits - Spring Every Three Years)

This course involves an interpretation of a selected book or literary units within the specified area. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of accepted principles of interpretation pertinent to the various types of literature and on the religious ideas and practical value of the material under consideration.
Next offering: Spring 2021
Prerequisites: BT 231 and 271

BT 442 Poetic and Prophetic Literature
(3 credits - Fall Every Three Years)

This course involves an interpretation of a selected book or literary units within the specified area. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of accepted principles of interpretation pertinent to the various types of literature and on the religious ideas and practical value of the material under consideration.
Next offering: Fall 2021
Prerequisites: BT 231 and 271

BT 443 Old Testament Historical Literature
(3 credits - Fall Every Three Years)

This course involves an interpretation of a selected book or literary units within the specified area. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of accepted principles of interpretation pertinent to the various types of literature and on the religious ideas and practical value of the material under consideration.
Next offering: Fall 2022
Prerequisites: BT 241 and 271

BT 445 Gospels
(3 credits - Spring Every Three Years)

This course involves an interpretation of a selected book or literary units within the specified area. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of accepted principles of interpretation pertinent to the various types of literature and on the religious ideas and practical value of the material under consideration.
Next offering: Spring 2023
Prerequisites: BT 251 and 271

BT 446 Epistles
(3 credits - Spring Every Three Years)

This course involves an interpretation of a selected book or literary units within the specified area. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of accepted principles of interpretation pertinent to the various types of literature and on the religious ideas and practical value of the material under consideration.
Next offering: Spring 2022
Prerequisites: BT 261 and 271

BT 447 New Testament History and Prophecy
(3 credits - Fall Every Three Years)

This course involves an interpretation of a selected book or literary units within the specified area. Emphasis will be placed on the practice of accepted principles of interpretation pertinent to the various types of literature and on the religious ideas and practical value of the material under consideration.
Next offering: Fall 2020
Prerequisites: BT 261 and 271

Courses in Greek

GR 111 Elementary Greek I
(3 credits - Fall Odd Years)

Introductory grammar of the Greek New Testament with emphases on grammatical analysis, vocabulary building and the development of reading skills. Some attention will be given to the translation of passages of the Greek New Testament.

GR 121 Elementary Greek II
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

A continuation of elementary Greek and translation of I John.
Prerequisite: GR 111

Courses in Hebrew

HE 111 Elementary Hebrew I
(3 credits - Fall Even Years)

An introductory study of the elements of the classical Hebrew language of the Old Testament. The study of Hebrew grammar, syntax and vocabulary will lead to an elementary ability to begin reading and translating texts from the Old Testament.

HE 121 Elementary Hebrew II
(3 credits - Spring Odd Years)

A continuation of elementary Hebrew and the development of translation skills.
Prerequisite: HE 111

Courses in Ministry and Missions

MI 195 Job Shadow in Ministry
(1 to 2 credits - Fall, Spring)

Students observe the daily routines and activities of employed professionals and see how skills and knowledge acquired in class are applied in the ministry and missions field.
Prerequisite: Consent

MI 211 Mission of the Church
(3 credits - Spring)

A study of the nature and mission of the church and its place in God's plan of redemption. Students refine their personal values, priorities, and practices and evaluate contemporary ministry models, challenges and controversies in light of their developing theology of the church and its mission.

MI 221 Lifespan Development for Ministry
(3 credits - Fall)

An investigation into the specific characteristics of cognitive, psychosocial, physical and spiritual development from preschool through all stages of adulthood. Special emphasis will be placed upon the significance of developmental characteristics for formulating effective relational ministry strategies.

MI 233 Topics in Missions
(2 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

A detailed examination of a selected missiological subject or skill.
May be repeated for credit in different topics.

MI 233CO Contextualization
(2 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

Leads students through a process of theological reflection on the relationship between the transcendent truths of the Christian faith and the particularities of human cultures. Students learn principles that will help them identify and promote biblically faithful inculturation of the Christian Gospel.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

MI 233CP Church Planting
(2 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

Considers church planting theories and models. Focus will be given to principles for establishing a reproducing church. Students will explore competencies for church planting in various settings.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

MI 233LA Language Acquisition
(2 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

Equips students to use learner-directed techniques to acquire language with the assistance of a host culture language helper.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

MI 233RS Regional Studies in Missions
(2 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

Will expose students to the geography, culture, traditional religions, mission history and current missionary efforts in a particular country, region or people group.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

MI 233ST Short-Term Mission Leadership
(2 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

Prepares students to plan and implement short-term missions experiences with special attention to team dynamics, spiritual and intercultural team preparation and ethical issues related to funding and intercultural contact.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

MI 233UM Urban Ministry
(2 credits - Offered on Sufficient Demand)

Presents a historical and theological framework for the development of the philosophy and practice of urban ministry. Urban social issues are examined from a biblical basis and informed by the study of the church's historical involvement in the city.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

MI 233VER Veritas Theology Institute International
(3 credits - Summer)

Students will travel to an international location where they will read theological works and be taught by theologians who are not from North America. Theological themes to be explored are God and power, church and vocation, the gospel and economics, and suffering. Students will also learn by visiting churches, ministries and other important locations in the host country, which will help them explore how cultural context shapes theology and theology shapes the church's response to the needs of the world. Students will explore their own sense of vocation in the context of what God is doing in the world-wide church.
Prerequisites: MI 285 (credit earned through Veritas Theology Institute) and approved application

MI 242 Discipleship and Evangelism
(3 credits - Spring)

A study of the principles, significant contexts and effective methods of evangelism and discipleship in light of the Bible and contemporary ministry literature. Students learn to facilitate the processes by which people move from being non-Christians to becoming mature followers of Jesus.

MI 251 Relationships in Ministry
(3 credits - Fall)

This course considers the ministry leader's relationship with others, with a focus on biblical insights and models for healthy communication and interpersonal dynamics. Issues and topics will include staff relations, volunteer management, conflict resolution, group dynamics and navigating the expectations of numerous constituencies.

MI 264 Theology of Worship
(3 credits - Fall Even Years)

Students in this course explore some of the main theological themes, topics and questions that emerge from the practice of Christian Worship. These include: the character of God, the nature of humanity, the role of Scripture and the enduring value of Christian tradition. A particular goal is for students to learn how the contemporary practice of Christian worship grows organically out of biblical and historical models. This knowledge will equip them to plan and lead worship that is attuned to both past and present, worship that stands in some degree of continuity with the church's historic commitments, even as it seeks to formulate new expressions of praise and thanksgiving.

MI 285 Understanding the Christian Faith
(3 credits - Fall, Spring)

Contemporary beliefs and practices of the Christian faith will be examined in light of foundational biblical concepts and themes. Students will reflect upon the role of Scripture and biblical concepts that have historically defined the Christian faith, the differences in Christian heritage so as to value both the fundamental unity of Christianity as well as the diversity within Christianity and their personal experiences and assumptions about the faith in order to understand better what they believe about Christianity.

MI 295 Practicum in Ministry and Missions
(1 to 3 credits - Fall, Spring)

Practicum in some aspect of ministry and missions designed to give student practical, directed experience.
Prerequisite: Consent

MI 304 Multi-Media, Technology and Worship
(2 credits - Spring Odd Years)

This course has two main objectives: first, to provide basic, hands-on training in several areas - principally sound reinforcement, lighting and visual presentation - where technology can be used to enhance the dynamics of corporate worship; and second, to ground such use within a framework of critical and theological reflection on the complex roles technology plays in contemporary society. Students will be expected to produce several projects for this course, and in so doing, to develop a responsible approach to the use of media and technology in worship.

MI 314 Worship Leadership for the Contemporary Church
(4 credits - Spring Even Years)

This course aims to immerse students in the practical leadership issues of worship ministry. In terms of music, students will learn how to run effective rehearsals, equip volunteer musicians, and continue to develop their musical gifts and abilities. Other issues addressed in this course are more pastoral in nature: how to direct the flow of a service, lead in public prayer and work collaboratively with colleagues in ministry. Students will gain confidence in these areas through repeated practice and careful, critical reflection upon the calling and the task of worship leadership.

MI 321 Intercultural Communication
(3 credits - Spring)

This course explores issues related to the intercultural communication process and considers the important role of context (social, cultural and historical) in intercultural interactions. This course examines the complex relationship between cultures and communication from various perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to managing cross-cultural conflict, cross-cultural teaching and cross-cultural ministry applications.
Identical with CO 322.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

MI 331 Ministry Leadership
(3 credits - Fall)

This course focuses on best leadership practices in Christian ministry, including both the local church and non-profit ministries. Emphasis is placed on practices that have a transformative Christian impact in the lives of those who are served, and structuring a ministry for maximum effectiveness. Included in the course is a study of biblical leaders, leadership and management principles and styles, and administrative responsibilities of the leader, such as vision-casting and financial oversight.

MI 344 Resources for Worship
(2 credits - Fall Odd Years)

The goal of this course is for students to become confident and discerning in their ability to plan effective, imaginative and faithful worship. Resources from various Christian traditions will be critically and charitably examined; special attention will be given to worship trends. Film, internet and other media sources will be considered and compared as viable resources for the work of worship planning.

MI 365 History and Theology of Missions
(3 credits - Fall)

This course considers theological, historical and strategic factors that impact missionary thought and practice. Students will explore the missionary nature of God, historical missionary efforts, key missiological movements and strategies and current progress in world evangelization.

MI 373 Personal Life of the Minister
(3 credits - Spring)

This course considers the ministry leader's relationship with Christ with a focus on holistic spiritual vitality. Issues and topics will include ministry calling, mentoring, self-management, personal integrity, and the role of spiritual disciplines in the life of the ministry leader.

MI 376 Youth Ministry
(3 credits - Spring)

With particular consideration given to the developmental needs of youth, this course is a comprehensive study of purposes, principles and programs effective in the ministry to young people. Students will articulate a biblical philosophy of ministry with adolescents.

MI 377 Contemporary American Youth Culture
(3 credits - Fall)

A study of the social and cultural forces shaping the experience of adolescence in contemporary America. Students will learn to evaluate individual elements of youth culture, analyze the cultural systems that shape young people and develop effective strategies for cultural engagement.

MI 381 Children's Ministry
(3 credits - Spring Even Years)

This course is a study of the purposes, principles and programs essential for effective and comprehensive family ministry. Emphasis will be given to children's evangelism, marriage and family needs, intergenerational ministry models and lifelong Christian education.
Prerequisite: MI 221

MI 395 Practicum in Ministry and Missions
(1 to 3 credits - Fall, Spring)

Practicum in some aspect of ministry and missions designed to give student practical, directed experience.
Prerequisite: Consent

MI 411 Curriculum Development
(3 credits - Spring)

A course in which the student will be guided in curriculum design. Philosophies, values, goals and objectives of curriculum will be studied to enable the student to structure curricula for persons in various age groups involved in the process of Christian education. Emphasis will be placed on understanding curriculum as the planning which is done to help persons progress in their spiritual walk.
Prerequisite: MI 401 or 421

MI 421 Teaching for Character Transformation
(3 credits - Fall)

Exploration will be made of the kind of teaching theory and methods necessary to facilitate learning which is viewed as cognitive, affective and behavioral change unto Christlikeness. A practice-oriented course, students will hone speaking and teaching skills.
Prerequisite: BT 271

MI 471 Issues in Ministry
(2 credits - Summer and Fall)

Selected topics and issues related to the contemporary practice of ministry in specific contexts will be studied through directed readings and pointed field investigations while the student is involved in the PRIME Experience.

MI 481 Ministry Skills
(3 credits - Spring)

This course includes the development of skills expected of those in Christian ministry. Topics include pastoral care and counseling, leading public prayer, platform presence, conducting the ordinances of baptism and the Lord's Supper, and officiating weddings and funerals.
Prerequisite: Seniors with no more than one additional semester left in their degree plans

MI 490 Independent Study
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

The study of a problem, a research paper or a project related to the major.
Prerequisite: Consent

MI 495 Internship
(2 to 4 credits - Fall, Spring)

A course designed to deal with the many functions of ministry and missions. The internship is designed as a practice-oriented, culminating experience in the student's career preparation. May be elected by all majors and minors in the department.
Prerequisite: Consent

MI 496 Field Ministry Immersion
(12 credits - Summer and Fall)

An intensive ministry experience spanning a seven-month period at a pre-approved location under the supervision of an approved ministry mentor in cooperation with ministry and missions faculty. This immersion, The PRIME Experience, must be completed in the concentration of choice.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and approved PRIME application