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Honors Program

The Huntington University Honors Program is a community of scholars from various academic backgrounds who love to learn and are skilled in engaging in the liberal arts inside and outside of the classroom. 

HU’s program fosters a culture of challenge and support and is interdisciplinary, providing a foundation for major disciplines and pre-professional programs. Special curricular and extracurricular opportunities serve as a point of departure for a lifetime of meaningful “face-to-face” encounters with God and God’s image-bearers.

The program intends for students of all disciplines to work together through deep, well-informed conversation to understand and solve problems in the world around them. 

There are three options for satisfying the curricular requirements:

OPTION 1

  • Freshmen honors students participate in two six-hour, face-to-face discussion seminars (HN 111/112 and HN 211/212); each replaces equivalent hours in the core curriculum (BT 111, EN 151, PL 220, MI 285), and is team-taught by two faculty from corresponding departments. The fall seminar is called “Face to Face in the Written Word,” and explores major themes of Scripture and various responses to these themes in some of the great literature of human history; the spring seminar is “Face to Face in Human Reason,” and considers the rudiments of philosophy and its contribution to our understanding of the divine. These sections are face-to-face because 1) they explore the dialectic between divine revelation and human literature; 2) the pedagogy emphasizes mutual learning and dialogue, not only among students, but also between faculty; and 3) the curriculum is centered around primary sources, so that students can encounter original texts and ideas for themselves.
  • Sophomores and juniors add to this foundation with three one-hour seminars in selected topics, including but not limited to Aesthetics, Leadership, Power and Corruption, Individual and Community, and Being Human.
  • Seniors write a one-hour research paper or some other culminating project that integrates their discipline with one of the themes from the honors program.

OPTION 2

  • Instead of taking both face-to-face freshman seminars, a student could choose to take only one. In this case, the other core credits would be satisfied through two of the traditional core offerings from BT 111 and EN 151 (in place of HN 111 and 112) or PL 220 and MI 285 (in place of HN 211 and 212).
  • These students would also take four one-hour seminars over their time at HU in selected topics, including but not limited to Aesthetics, Leadership, Power and Corruption, Individual and Community, and Being Human. The one extra seminar helps these students to have more interaction with honors students and faculty, integrating more effectively into the community.
  • Seniors write a one-hour research paper or some other culminating project that integrates their discipline with one of the themes from the honors program.

OPTION 3

  • Instead of taking both face-to-face freshman seminars, a student could choose not to take them at all. In this case, the corresponding core credits would be satisfied through the traditional core offerings from BT 111, EN 151, PL 220, and MI 285.
  • These students would also take five one-hour seminars over their time at HU in selected topics, including but not limited to Aesthetics, Leadership, Power and Corruption, Individual and Community, and Being Human. The two extra seminars help these students to have more interaction with honors students and faculty, integrating more effectively into the community.
  • Seniors write a one-hour research paper or some other culminating project that integrates their discipline with one of the themes from the honors program.

Incoming college freshmen and sophomores with a 3.5 GPA and a teacher’s recommendation are eligible to interview for a place in the Honors Program. Please send inquiries to honors@huntington.edu.

Courses in Honors Program

HN 111 Face to Face in the Written Word
(3 credits - Fall)

Discussion seminar on major themes from Scripture and their representation in the great books. Team taught by the Christian thought and practice and English departments and combines core credit for BT 111 and EN 151.
Must be taken concurrently with HN 112.
Prerequisite: EN 121

HN 112 Face to Face in the Written Word
(3 credits - Fall)

Discussion seminar on major themes from Scripture and their representation in the great books. Team taught by the Christian thougth and practice and English departments and combines core credit for BT 111 and EN 151.
Must be taken concurrently with HN 111.
Prerequisite: EN 121

HN 211 Face to Face in Human Reason
(3 credits - Spring)

Discussion seminar considering selected questions in classical and contemporary philosophy, and their connection with contemporary beliefs and practices of the Christian Faith. Team taught by the ministry and missions and philosophy departments and combines core credit for MI 285 and PL 220.
Must be taken concurrently with HN 212.

HN 212 Face to Face in Human Reason
(3 credits - Spring)

Discussion seminar considering selected questions in classical and contemporary philosophy, and their connection with contemporary beliefs and practices of the Christian Faith. Team taught by the ministry and missions and philosophy departments and combines core credit for MI 285 and PL 220.
Must be taken concurrently with HN 211.

HN 301 Honors Colloquium: Aesthetics
(1 credit - Fall Every Three Years)

This course will focus on two classic Greek texts with special attention to an understanding of the aesthetics that helped shape Western views of beauty and art. Discussions will center around key themes that run throughout each text. An example of texts would be Plato's "Republic," Aristotle's "Poetics" and Longinus' "On the Sublime."
Prerequisite: Admittance into the Honors Program

HN 302 Honors Colloquium: Leadership
(1 credit - Spring Every Three Years)

The focus of this course will be two classic Roman texts with special attention given to a discussion of leadership and how it is defined within the context of the chosen texts and Roman culture. This will lend itself to broader discussions about what makes an effective leader. Sample companion texts would be Virgil's "The Aeneid" and one or more of Plutarch's "Lives" such as his "Caesar."
Prerequisite: Admittance into the Honors Program

HN 303 Honors Colloquium: Christendom
(1 credit - Fall Every Three Years)

This course will focus on Christendom with special attention given to classic Christian texts. Engaging in the individual text's portrayal of the Christian worldview will be emphasized, with particular attention given to themes like the notion of sin or other relevant issues raised in the texts. Texts that could be paired would be Augustine's "Confessions" and Dante's "Inferno."
Prerequisite: Admittance into the Honors Program

HN 304 Honors Colloquium: Power and Corruption
(1 credit - Spring Every Three Years)

The focus of this course will be the notion of power and corruption that often follows the precepts of the sort of leader Machiavelli describes. Two texts that could be paired would be Machiavelli's "The Prince" and Shakespeare's "Richard III."
Prerequisite: Admittance into the Honors Program

HN 305 Honors Colloquium: The Individual and Community
(1 credit - Fall Every Three Years)

This course will focus on the tension between being an individual and living in community with special attention on the role an individual plays in developing community as well as the role the community plays in serving the common good. A pair of texts which could be paired for this exploration could be "The Communist Manifesto" by Marx and Engels and "The Second Treatise of Government" by John Locke.
Prerequisite: Admittance into the Honors Program

HN 306 Honors Colloquium: Being Human
(1 credit - Spring Every Three Years)

The focus of this course will be centered on a key question relating to what makes us human. This might include an exploration of human physiology, the mind and our emotions or the soul, ultimately considering what separates us from other animals. Texts that could be explored together might be Darwin's "Origin of Species" and Freud's "Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis" and the influence that these theories have had on an understanding of ourselves and our place in the world.
Prerequisite: Admittance into the Honors Program

HN 308 Honors Colloquium: Christian Essaying
(1 credit - Fall Every Three Years)

The course begins with a session on the origins of the essay as a literary form. This will be followed with reading and class discussion of essays from two to three Christian writers who have excelled in the form. Potential writers may include G. K. Chesterton, C. S. Lewis, Flannery O'Connor, Wendell Berry, and Marilynne Robinson. The course concludes with each student's short essaying in response to the readings.
Prerequisite: Admittance into the Honors Program

HN 401 Independent Honors Project
(1 credit - Fall, Spring)

Students in the Honors Program complete this independent project during their seventh or eighth semester of study. The project must engage one or more of the texts studied in previous honors courses and must relate to the student's major field. Students will design a project in a medium of their choice. Projects are led by the Director of the Honors Program and supervised by a faculty member in the student's major.
A form describing the project is completed and submitted before a student can be registered.
Prerequisites: Admittance into the Honors Program and completion of five out of six Honors Colloquium courses

HN 490 Independent Study
(1 to 4 credits - Fall, January, Spring, Summer)

A study of various aspects of the liberal arts, the subject area of which will be determined by the instructor according to student interest.
Prerequisite: Consent