The Huntington University Honors Program is a community of scholars from various academic backgrounds who love to learn and are skilled in engaging in the liberal arts inside and outside of the classroom. 

HU’s program fosters a culture of challenge and support and is interdisciplinary, providing a foundation for major disciplines and pre-professional programs. Special curricular and extracurricular opportunities serve as a point of departure for a lifetime of meaningful “face-to-face” encounters with God and God’s image-bearers.

The program intends for students of all disciplines to work together through deep, well-informed conversation to understand and solve problems in the world around them. 

There are three options for satisfying the curricular requirements:

OPTION 1

  • Freshmen honors students participate in two six-hour, face-to-face discussion seminars (HN 111/112 and HN 211/212); each replaces equivalent hours in the core curriculum (BR 111, EN 151, PL 220, MI 285), and is team-taught by two faculty from corresponding departments. The fall seminar is called “Face to Face in the Written Word,” and explores major themes of Scripture and various responses to these themes in some of the great literature of human history; the spring seminar is “Face to Face in Human Reason,” and considers the rudiments of philosophy and its contribution to our understanding of the divine. These sections are face-to-face because 1) they explore the dialectic between divine revelation and human literature; 2) the pedagogy emphasizes mutual learning and dialogue, not only among students, but also between faculty; and 3) the curriculum is centered around primary sources, so that students can encounter original texts and ideas for themselves.
  • Sophomores and juniors add to this foundation with three one-hour seminars in selected topics, including but not limited to Aesthetics, Leadership, Power and Corruption, Individual and Community, and Being Human.
  • Seniors write a one-hour research paper or some other culminating project that integrates their discipline with one of the themes from the honors program.

OPTION 2

  • Instead of taking both face-to-face freshman seminars, a student could choose to take only one. In this case, the other core credits would be satisfied through two of the traditional core offerings from BR 111 and EN 151 (in place of HN 111 and 112) or PL 220 and MI 285 (in place of HN 211 and 212).
  • These students would also take four one-hour seminars over their time at HU in selected topics, including but not limited to Aesthetics, Leadership, Power and Corruption, Individual and Community, and Being Human. The one extra seminar helps these students to have more interaction with honors students and faculty, integrating more effectively into the community.
  • Seniors write a one-hour research paper or some other culminating project that integrates their discipline with one of the themes from the honors program.

OPTION 3

  • Instead of taking both face-to-face freshman seminars, a student could choose not to take them at all. In this case, the corresponding core credits would be satisfied through the traditional core offerings from BR 111, EN 151, PL 220, and MI 285.
  • These students would also take five one-hour seminars over their time at HU in selected topics, including but not limited to Aesthetics, Leadership, Power and Corruption, Individual and Community, and Being Human. The two extra seminars help these students to have more interaction with honors students and faculty, integrating more effectively into the community.
  • Seniors write a one-hour research paper or some other culminating project that integrates their discipline with one of the themes from the honors program.

Incoming college freshmen and sophomores with a 3.5 GPA and a teacher’s recommendation are eligible to interview for a place in the Honors Program. Please send inquiries to honors@huntington.edu.

 

Courses in Honors Program