Instructors: Jeffrey Webb, Dwight Brautigam, Kate Brown, Timothy Smith

The American Historical Society describes the study of history as “an encompassing discipline. Its essence is in the connectedness of historical events and human experiences . . . [in] understanding the nature of continuity and change in human experiences. Contemporary issues, ideas and relationships take on new meanings when they are explored from historical perspectives. History, therefore, plays an integrative role in the quest for liberal learning. . . .”

Study in the History and Political Science Department aims at enabling students to come to grips with the world around them through an understanding of the past and the perspectives that this provides on societies and cultures in different times and places. Students are encouraged to read, think, discuss and write critically and effectively as they learn to ‘do history’ through historical inquiry, explanation and argument. Because of the integrative nature of history, interdisciplinary approaches are used in many courses in the department. Students are also encouraged to explore basic values and worldviews of their own and other cultural traditions, and in turn, to articulate their personal values, faith and worldview.

Program in History, Political Science, Pre-Law, History - Education, and International and Development Studies

Students who choose history as a major for the bachelor of arts degree will complete HS 101, 115, 116, 211, 212, 222, 261; PS 111; six hours chosen from HS 322, 337, and 487; and nine additional hours in history, eight of which must be in courses numbered 300 or above. Up to six hours of approved substitutes may be included in the major. PS 111 may be counted as one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum. Students considering graduate study in history are strongly encouraged to complete 12 hours of foreign language study in a modern language.

Students who choose political science as a major for the bachelor of arts degree will complete HS 115, 116, 211, 212, 222, 261; PS 101, 111, 342, 377 (or 466), 428, 434; one course from PS 346, 364, 385, 456, and 495; and PL 260. PS 111 may be counted as one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum, and PL 260 may be counted as the philosophy requirement in the core curriculum. Students considering graduate study in political science should take MA 151 as their core math requirement. Students who intend to take the LSAT (Law School Admission Test) as part of an application to law school should take PL 240 Logic. Students are strongly encouraged to complete 12 hours of foreign language study in a modern language.

Students who choose history with an emphasis in pre-law for the bachelor of arts degree will complete HS 101, 115, 116, 211, 212, 222, 261; PS 105, 111; six hours chosen from HS 322, 337, and 487; and nine additional hours in history, eight of which must be in courses numbered 300 or above. PS 111 may be counted as one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum. Students who choose political science with an emphasis in pre-law for the bachelor of arts degree will complete HS 115, 116, 211, 212, 222, 261; PS 101, 105, 111, 342, 377 (or 466), 428, and 434; one course from PS 346, 364, 385, and 456; and PL 260. PS 111 may be counted as one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum, and PL 260 may be counted as the philosophy requirement in the core curriculum. Pre-law students are encouraged to select their general electives from history and political science courses at the 300 level or above, as well as BA 351; CO 370, 381; and SO 292, 333, and 444. Students who intend to take the LSAT (Law School Admission Test) as part of an application to law school should take PL 240 Logic. Students are strongly encouraged to complete 12 hours of foreign language study in a modern language.

Students who choose history - education as a major for the bachelor of science degree can be licensed in Indiana to teach history, government and geography in a middle or high school setting. The major requires HS 101, 115, 116, 211, 212, 222, 261; EB 211; PS 111; six hours from HS 322, 337, and 487; nine additional hours in political science chosen from PS 342, 346, 364, 377, 428, 456, 466, or approved January Term courses (students must take PS 377 or 466 as part of the nine hours in political science); PY 111 and SO 111. To add a content concentration in economics, students also complete EB 212 and one additional 300 or 400-level EB course. To add a content concentration in psychology, students also complete PY 211 and six additional hours in psychology. To add a content concentration in sociology, students also complete SO 292, 321, and three additional hours in sociology. Refer to the Department of Education for education courses required for teacher licensing.

Students who choose international and development studies as a major for the bachelor of arts degree will complete the following core curriculum courses: HS 115, 116, SO 111, EB 211, and BR 331. In addition, students are required to complete HS 261, PS/SO 171, CO 322/MI 321, PS 395ID (3 hours), and at least 15 hours of electives from the following three concentrations. (Students must take at least one elective from each concentration and eight hours must be at 300 level or above.)
     Politics and Environment: AG 111, 241, ES 211/L, EB 461, PS 111, 346, 364, 456, or appropriate January Term courses
     Service and Culture: BR 311FOR, MI 233CO, 233LA, 233RS, 365, SS 202, TE 233, 234, or appropriate January Term courses
     People and Society: PY 211, 215, 230, 341, 351, SO 141, 321, 333, 413, 421, or appropriate January Term courses

Students who choose history as a minor will complete HS 115, 116, 211 (or 212), 222, 261, and seven hours in history courses numbered 300 or above or appropriate January Term courses.

Students who choose museum studies as a minor will complete HS 115, 116; BA 252; four hours of AR/HS 495; and nine hours from HS 211, 212, 222, 261, AR 371 and 381. Students interested in interning and eventually working in an art museum should select both AR 371 and 381.

Students who choose political science as a minor will complete PS 105, 111; HS 211 (or 212), 222, 261; and seven hours from PS 171, PS courses numbered 300 or above, or appropriate January Term courses.

Students who choose refugee studies as a minor will complete PS 171, 395RE (1-3 hours); CO 322/MI 321; and at least 13 hours from BR 311FOR, 331, HS 261, MI 233CO, 233LA, 233RS, PS 346, 364, 456, PY 211 (or 215 or 230), 341, 351, SN 111, 121, SO 111, 141, 321, 333, 413, 421, SS 202, TE 233, 234, or any appropriate January Term courses for a total of 22 hours in the minor.

 

Courses in History

 

Courses in Political Science