The English and Modern Languages Department invites all students to enter the dialogue about human life through the distinctive integration of writing, reading, creative expression, communication and critical thinking. In every class, the student is continually challenged to write clearly and effectively, to read carefully and critically and to care deeply, reflecting the Christ-centered focus of the University. The English and Modern Languages Department serves the goals of the entire institution and all students, regardless of major.

Students with interests in language, literature, artistic expression and critical thinking should consider majoring in English. Students may choose a major in English-literature, English-writing, American studies, British and postcolonial studies, or liberal studies leading to a bachelor of arts degree for general preparation and as a foundation for graduate study, or they may choose a bachelor of science degree in English education to prepare for teacher licensing.

Students who choose to become English majors should expect to commit themselves to substantial reading, to ongoing dialogue with other thinkers and to excellence in writing. All English majors prepare not just for specific careers but for all of life by listening to, learning from and sometimes arguing with the thinkers and writers who continue to shape our world.

Many students in English prepare for a career teaching English at the secondary level. Others primarily look toward graduate school in hopes of becoming professors. Others are preparing to be creative writers, journalists, editors, publishers, technical writers or public relations specialists. Others find English to be an excellent foundation for law school, library science, seminary and ministry, overseas missions, theatre, business, and any vocation that requires people to think deeply and to communicate clearly. Business leaders have shown that English majors are successful employees in the world marketplace.

English majors are expected to do substantial study of American, British and world literature and significant writing in a variety of genres. Students work closely with faculty on writing projects, including publication of Ictus, the department-sponsored literary magazine, and the campus newspaper, The Huntingtonian. English majors are also encouraged to participate in campus dramatic productions, poetry readings, writing workshops and professional conferences.

Students who choose English-literature as a major in the bachelor of arts degree will complete EN 221, 311, 321, 337, 374, 375, 386, 387, 395 (one hour), 431, 452, 453 and 454. Students pursuing the bachelor of arts degree must complete 12 hours in the same language or at least six hours in the same language coupled with six hours of cultural enrichment courses to fulfill the language requirement.

Students who choose English-literature as a major with an emphasis in pre-law for the bachelor of arts degree will complete EN 221, 311, 321, 337, 374, 375, 386, 387, 395 (one hour), 431, 452, 453 and 454. Students pursuing pre-law may opt to substitute EN 455 for one of the 400-level courses except EN 431. Students pursuing pre-law should plan to enroll in PS 105, 111, and PL 260. PS 111 may be counted as one of the social science requirements in the core curriculum, and PL 260 may be counted as the philosophy requirement in the core curriculum. Students who intend to take the LSAT (Law School Admission Test) as part of an application to law school should take PL 240 Logic. Pre-law students are encouraged to select their general electives from PS 342, 377, 428, 434, 466; BA 351; CO 370, 381; and SO 292, 333, and 345 and are strongly encouraged to complete 12 hours of foreign language study in a modern language. Students may also consider adding the legal studies minor.

Students who choose English-writing as a major in the bachelor of arts degree will complete EN 221, 362, 363, 391, 395 (one hour), 455, 465; CO 241 and 342. An additional twelve hours will be selected from EN 311, 321, 337, 374, 375, 386, 387, 431, 452, 453, 454 or DM 330. Students pursuing the bachelor of arts degree must complete 12 hours in the same language or at least six hours in the same language coupled with six hours of cultural enrichment courses to fulfill the language requirement.

Students who choose American studies as a major in the bachelor of arts degree will complete EN 221, 311, 321, 337, 452; HS 211, 212, and 361. An additional twelve hours will be selected from CO 485, HS 377, 381, 385, 456, MI 377, SO 321, or 413. Students pursuing the bachelor of arts degree must complete 12 hours in the same language or at least six hours in the same language coupled with six hours of cultural enrichment courses to fulfill the language requirement.

Students who choose British and postcolonial studies as a major in the bachelor of arts degree will complete EN 221, 386, 387, 431, 453, 454; HS 261, 322, 337, and 411. An additional six hours will be selected from BR 331, HS 346, PL 321, 333MP, 333PL, 460, or SO 421. Students pursuing the bachelor of arts degree must complete 12 hours in the same language or at least six hours in the same language coupled with six hours of cultural enrichment courses to fulfill the language requirement.

Students who choose liberal studies as a major in the bachelor of arts degree will complete CO 111; two of the following four pairs of courses for a total of 12-14 hours from AR 371 and 381, MU 341 and 342, PL 311 and 321, or TH 311 and 312; and two of the following three pairs of courses for a total of 12 hours from EN 311 and 321, EN 374 and 375, or EN 386 and 387. An additional nine hours will be selected from BR 311, 320, 333, 341, CO 246, 266, HS 373, MI 264, PL 333MP, 333PT, 460, SO 421, or TH 331RP. Students pursuing the bachelor of arts degree must complete 12 hours in the same language or at least six hours in the same language coupled with six hours of cultural enrichment courses to fulfill the language requirement.

Students who choose English education as a major for language arts teacher licensing will complete EN 221, 311, 321, 337, 362 or 363, 374, 375, 386, 387, 391, 431 and 455. An additional three hours will be selected from EN 452, 453, or 454. Refer to the Department of Education for education courses required for teacher licensing.

The University minor in literature requires EN 221, 395 (one hour), 431, and 15 hours from EN 311, 321, 337, 374, 375, 386, 387, 452, 453, or 454.

The University minor in writing requires EN 362, 363, 391, 395 (one hour), 455, and 465; CO 241 and 342.

 

Courses in English

 

Modern Languages

The study of a modern language is strongly recommended for all students, not only to acquire linguistic skills, but for the purpose of gaining insight into the cultural diversity of the people of the world. Students who have studied two or more years of a language in high school and wish to continue should take the CLEP examination in that language no later than July, so that they can be properly placed. Advanced Placement can also be used for language placement and credit may also be allowed for students who achieve a score of three or higher on some AP language tests.

The University minor in Spanish requires a minimum of 22 hours, including SN 211, 221, and 16 additional hours in the Spanish through the Semester in Spain program or in approved transfer courses in Spanish. Prior to the Semester in Spain, students must receive credit for SN 221 Intermediate Spanish II (or equivalent credit through CLEP or AP examinations). Students will normally complete 16 hours in the Semester in Spain program. These hours will be counted as 16 hours of the minor. Students are placed in courses on the basis of testing at the beginning of the experience. Additional information about the Semester in Spain program is included in the section on off-campus programs. SN 111 and 121 do not count toward the minor in Spanish.

The bachelor of arts degree in Spanish and the bachelor of science degree in Spanish education are suspended until the University resumes offering 300 and 400 level courses in Spanish. 

Courses in Spanish and French numbered 300 or higher will not be offered until further notice.

 

Courses in Chinese

 

Courses in French

 

Courses in German

 

Courses in Spanish